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Hey guys, i have a few questions about making a wooden slingshot. You probably know what I'm talking about when i say that most custom made slingshots are cut out of what seems to be just a board. i have been thinking of ways i could make a slingshot and though about trying out this method. for those experienced guy out there, i was hopping you could give me some information on how to do this. what tools would i need and what type of wood - thickness, type and if i need a pattern

this is my first post and i appreciate every who takes a look and give me some advice if you can
 

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Welcome to the forum Devan. I have only made two board cuts. Poplar is a good wood to start with. You can get it at Lowe's or Home Depot. I use 3/4 inch. Jt
 

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Tex-shooter
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Any hard wood, but I like Hard Maple the best because its grain structure is very strong. Tex
 

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to get started on the cheap you can use any decent strong wood from the hardware store, then get a coping saw (for cutting out the shape) a couple grades of wood file or rasp for rounding and shaping the frame, then some sandpaper to finish. the whole works shouldnt cost you more than about 15 or 20 bucks. of course once you make a couple you will be hooked and investing in bandsaws, belt sanders, routers, and many other fancy but unneeded power tools
oh and dont forget something to seal the wood (tongue oil, or varnish or something similar) its not needed for a functioning slingshot but if you want it to look good and withstand the test of time its a needed step.
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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I suggest you make several patterns out of 1/8'' partical board first. You can hold them for feel and file them for better fit. Keep making a new pattern until you get what you want. Then buy some hardwood of your choice. Poplar and oak are the easiest to get at a building supply or go to a woodworkers supply for other types of hardwood.
For the safest and toughest slingshot I strongly suggest you glue at least two or even three slabs of 3/8'' together, which will alternate grain patterns and stop natural fracture lines along the grain.
If you find a pattern you want to make a lot of slingshots with, simply trace your pattern on to paper and photocopy as many as you want. You can spray glue the back of the paper and stick it to your board and cut it out. The paper will easily peal off when you are done. You can trace right off the pattern, but for mass production the photo copy saves a lot of trace time.
If you cut a big "V" in the end of a board and clamp it to a table, you can use it to support the wood you are cutting with the blade of your coping saw inside of the "V". This allows you to move the wood freely while cutting with the blade in one general direction. The teeth of the coping saw should face the handle and the handle should be under the support board while cutting.
 

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A good scroll saw in the neighborhood of around USD 125 would make the cutting of large quantities of patterns a lot easier, faster, and safer. Top it off with a rotary tool and you're in business! Of course, a source of good patterns is a must!
 

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Whatever you do, don't buy cheap tools!
You can get nice tools for less, but don't buy badly built tools thinking you are making a good bargain. That way lies heartache!

The main thing is not to fret too much over dfoing it "Right". Play around with it and do what you find works for you. Try a few different styles and patterns, perhaps.
 

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I design on the computer, transfer to a formica template then scribe round that and cut to shape. This gives me a deliberate approach, accurate results and a way of reproducing my work consistently. Some (most) people just pick up a board and get cutting! That works just fine as well. I have made slingshots from 1/8" steel, 1/4" acrylic, 1/2" G-10, right up to blocks of wood or plastic two inches thick. As long as the fork will take the strain at its weakest point, it's OK.
 

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"Southern Flip Style"
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Just wanted to say welcome Devan. You have received great advice already so saying more would not add much unless you have further questions.
 
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