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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was asked by a few to show a little more of the stalking aspect of rabbit hunting with a slingshot... so here it is. I saw this little guy out in the grass so set up a camera and went out to show how I do it if there's no way to set up a distraction or lure.
It took me about 3 minutes to get into position for the stalk, a lot of boring air so I just cut to the "meat" of the stalk, when I was close enough to the rabbit for it to really notice me.
I know it's difficult to see the whole thing, but watching it in full screen does help. Basically, you walk slowly in a loop to the backside of the rabbit. If it seems like he's reacting to you, stop and wait until his attention is off of you and then move. Your goal is to get in line with the back of his head and then slowly move towards it without making any noise.
Usually I can get to about 35 feet of the rabbit, but on this one I stepped on a twig and he hopped a little... knowing he was now aware and a little spooked I went on ahead and took the shot. His head and neck was not a viable option so I went for his heart... he hopped a little ways after impact and then died.

Ammo used was .41 lead, and the slingshot used was my Scorpion banded up with single per side 1" X 12" gold theraband... this propels the ball at about 250-260 fps, which is more than enough to go all the way through the rabbit. I'd use my Texshooter latex but I realized I only have a little left and there's some special challenge shots I want to get done... theraband is more than adequate for hunting but Tex's stuff is needed for what I'm planning!


What I used:
 

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Thanks for the video Bill, good information there for the open field hunting.
 

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Great as always Bill -- Tex
 

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Thanks Guys.

I also did a quick "how to skin a rabbit" vid by request too... It is the rabbit from the video above... it's interesting because you can see what the wound looks like with the skin removed:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0wHpMGHbhk[/media]

and here's one where I used the white cloth distraction technique on:
[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPkJTmLkllg
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nice man, I don't think you could give a much better tutorial than that. You say you are shooting .41 lead at 250+ fps, why do you need more power??? you gunna hunt hogs with a slingshot???
Lol, no... I'm going to do something nobody's done before... but it's kind of dangerous so I can't go into details about it... yet
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah, the cottontails are fairly small... pretty dumb and kind of slow.... and there's tons of them around here.... perfect slingshot prey!
Jackrabbits, on the other hand.... big, long and lanky... extremely dumb, very fast... incredible pests (as bad as or worse than rats) that NEED to be controlled. They've been hunted to where there's very few around this area now... open field coursing and a .22... distraction and luring works on them extremely well if you're by yourself, so they're also perfect slingshot prey....

Taste-wise, the cottontail is just better.... tender and moist... whereas the Jackrabbit (which I grew up eating, and you know why Jeff), is usually kind of stringy, dry and tough.
 

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Yeah, the cottontails are fairly small... pretty dumb and kind of slow.... and there's tons of them around here.... perfect slingshot prey!
Jackrabbits, on the other hand.... big, long and lanky... extremely dumb, very fast... incredible pests (as bad as or worse than rats) that NEED to be controlled. They've been hunted to where there's very few around this area now... open field coursing and a .22... distraction and luring works on them extremely well if you're by yourself, so they're also perfect slingshot prey....

Taste-wise, the cottontail is just better.... tender and moist... whereas the Jackrabbit (which I grew up eating, and you know why Jeff), is usually kind of stringy, dry and tough.
do you give your greyhounds a run on them
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Now Jeff.... you know I can't talk about that since the laws changed. Let's just say, no jackrabbits live around here anymore... and cottontails, well you don't need a dog for them!

Of course I don't have to tell this Jeff... as you're already an ace hunter.

Which kind of brings me to another point... that really was the reason I videoed a few of the kills I've done with a slingshot... I've had more than a few people emailing and asking for advice about hunting etc. as they simply couldn't get it done.... and I just never thought of it as being all that difficult. So I did a few videos on the subject.
One thing I do have that's an advantage over most people is really good eyesite and the ability to pick out animals against the background... that coupled with having done it thousands of times gives a sort of nonchalant confidence to the whole affair.
The most important things about hunting without dogs, in my opinion, are patience (wait on getting the right shot)... being observant, can't tell you how many people simply can't see what's right in front of them.... being a good shot, once you're in position you should be able to hit what you're aiming at.... and just knowing the habits and signs the game you're after uses.
 

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Now Jeff.... you know I can't talk about that since the laws changed. Let's just say, no jackrabbits live around here anymore... and cottontails, well you don't need a dog for them!

Of course I don't have to tell this Jeff... as you're already an ace hunter.

Which kind of brings me to another point... that really was the reason I videoed a few of the kills I've done with a slingshot... I've had more than a few people emailing and asking for advice about hunting etc. as they simply couldn't get it done.... and I just never thought of it as being all that difficult. So I did a few videos on the subject.
One thing I do have that's an advantage over most people is really good eyesite and the ability to pick out animals against the background... that coupled with having done it thousands of times gives a sort of nonchalant confidence to the whole affair.
The most important things about hunting without dogs, in my opinion, are patience (wait on getting the right shot)... being observant, can't tell you how many people simply can't see what's right in front of them.... being a good shot, once you're in position you should be able to hit what you're aiming at.... and just knowing the habits and signs the game you're after uses.
didnt know the laws over there, were can hunt rabbits with dogs as long as the land owner knows and says yes, we can hunt most thisng with guns, but no bows, catapults as long as you dont make the aminal suffer, jeff
 
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