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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a relationship between the two? Obviously it wouldn't affect left to right accuracy, but what about elevation? Does it really matter as long as your hold elevation is consistent? Or is shooting flatter more consistent?

I can see how shooting flatter would give you a more consistent hold point at different ranges, but if I shoot at a consistent range, wouldn't it be irrelevant?
 

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I was just struggling with this very issue about velocity. My personal opinion is higher velocity improves overall accuracy from the standpoint you just mentioned - flatter trajectory.

I started with 0.50" steel ammo that was heavy and slow, but worked well shooting at 10 yds in my basement range. What I noticed was I would have a vertical component to my groups more than a horizontal. This suggested the trajectory (influenced by velocity) was the main culprit and that I had inconsistencies in my anchor in relations to draw length. Some shots were getting more power and thus flew flatter and vice versa. Average velocity was around 150fps.

I have since switched to 10mm steel ammo with slightly lighter bands and my groups have shrunk by nearly an inch and became more circular than a vertically oriented oval. The 10mm ammo was about half the weight and I gained nearly 50fps, putting me just shy of 200fps. On paper, I had less kinetic energy, but my ability to hit what I was aiming at was improved - all of which was in my basement 10 yd range. Having lighter bands also helps as well, but I do think the main reason was the flatter trajectory reducing the amount of elevation correction needed. Obviously, shooting at unknown distances (like in hunting) is where having flat trajectories really helps, but overall, a faster, flatter flying shot is usually better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I shoot .5" marbles - Daisy ammo, which are slightly lighter than 3/8 steel. I like them because I get a cleaner release with the larger size, and they're dirt cheap at my Wal Mart. I use light bands and don't shorten them, so I'm not getting much velocity, though I haven't measured.

I'm accurate, but like you, I definitely miss more in elevation than I do left to right. That could also be that I'm looking down the band to aim, so there's less margin for error. I've also noticed that my elevation hold point changes depending on temp, number of shots, etc... A flatter trajectory might help that, but I also like the benefits of light bands that last a long time.

Do you notice that your elevation hold point changes with faster bands?
 

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Yes. My point of aim is different with the faster bands. With the slow 0.50" ammo at 150fps, I could noticeably see the ball drop on its way to the catch box. As a result, I had to hold a tiny bit higher and ended up with a smaller gap. The faster 10mm ammo at 200fps pretty much flew straight and I did not have to hold as high to compensate for ammo drop.
 

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If you shoot a 9.5 mm steel ball at some 65 m/s from a fork that is 1.5 m high at a target that is 15 m away and whose center is 1.5 m high then you should elevate your shooting angle so that your "bore line" - and in this case "slingshot line" - is pointed to some 26.3 mm above the target center.

If you shoot the same system but at some 75 m/s then you need to point your slingshot at some 19.7 mm above the target center.

Obviously, the second case is easier since your elevation point is closer to the target (ideally you should point your slingshot at the very target center and hit it - maybe with a laser beam)...

The more interesting point for me is this: how does one reach higher velocity, as in the second example above: if I do it myself by using more power I get WORSE results no matter my velocity is higher, simply because my hand is not so steady and this condition worsens with power.

The only way I get more velocity is by using lighter ammo and/or extending my draw length.

cheers,

jazz
 

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Here's a thought - A faster projectile reaches it's target in a shorter amount of time. Say you were shooting with a strong crosswind, a faster projectile has less time to be affected by environmental factors, e.g. the wind, so I guess in that scenario a faster projectile could equal more accuracy?
 

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Speaking in terms of a variable target distance, higher velocity will result in less drop. Seems pretty straight forward. Every band/ammo combination will have a point at which the drop becomes too much to easily account for.

I shoot instinctively and so if I shoot a 5/16 and a 7/16 using the same bands there is a point at which my instinctive aim point for the 7/16 becomes too unpredictable whereas I can still hit with the 5/16. Too much drop with the slower load.

Flatter is better.
 

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A flater trajectory feels easier to get on target and is more fun for sure... but up to a limit because having more rubber introduces hold instability? I believe there'd be an optimum to match bandsets and ammo to a given frame. Frame design is another factor - a stable frame allows for heavier bandsets.

Chinese competition shooters however use the lightest bands they can. The easy draw and stable hold is coveted and their results speak for itself. Having said that, the light set-up used for competition wouldn't work for hunting... so again, it's about tailoring your setup for the situation and finding your own optimum for a given frame and the intended purpose. Accuracy will increase with familarity on a frame and set-up I think?
 
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