Slingshots Forum banner
  • Enter Our Dog Days of Summer BBQ Giveaway Now!  ENDING SOON

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,099 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So far I have mostly just polished my frames and lightly oiled them, that was it. But shooting in the snow will eventually mean that I touch them with wet hands, and they will feel pelty afterwards, need repolishing.

So I have been looking into sealers.

I bought both polyurethane (for yachts)and shellac (for furniture), used them on recent forks I made.

The shellac takes very long to fully dry, like three days or so. It is possible to sand it carefully and polish it, it does take on a high sheen this way. But it remains kind of soft, more like a filmy coat.

The polyurethane is very thin and needs a few layers. It dries out to a high sheen, but can not be polished without loosing the shine. It will be very smooth, but not shiny. When you use it, you must do so in dust free environments, as you can't polish out the dust.

But of course these are my first attempts, I am sure others have a great deal of experience with coating.
 

·
Slingshots Canada
Joined
·
708 Posts
I only use polyurethane apply roughly 5 coats (more if needed) inbetween coats i water sand with 600 grit paper which usually results in a pretty darn even glass like coating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts
Like Gib I use polyurethane with fine sanding between coats.As many coats as it takes to get an even finish, usually 8-10. Polyurethane is far more durable than shellac. The Traditional Bowyers Bible (vol 1?) did comparative tests of finishes, it is hard to beat polyurethane for durability and for sealing the wood.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,029 Posts
I dunk my frames in the Poly then hang them up in a little cardboard box with a plastic sheeting cover. 2-3 coats with a light sand in between each a finer grit. I finish with a 400. When dry,I cut the drip nipples off, sand and then just do a quick touch-up. They come out great. You really want a durable hard shine try Spar-Urethane. I use that as well. Most hunters do not like a high gloss finish. Every reflection counts when stalking!
Flatband
 

·
Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
Joined
·
11,147 Posts
Joerg, I don't like the hi-gloss on my slingshots. But if it is important to you, try first shellac, about 2 - 3 coats, then varnish about 3 coats. Seals better in case the varnish cracks. But in my opinion if you use many coats of linseed oil and polish it, you have the best finish for outdoor use. The varnish finish is good for furniture which doesn't go outside and get dropped and knocked around. But for roughly used slingshots and stuff you run the risk of chipping the varnish and letting moisture seep in under the varnish and ruining the wood.
(Just my opinion.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
What I'm using Joerg on some of the more porous wood on my knife handles is a professional
two part acrylic expoxy resin coating as used on boat decks etc.

I warm the 2-1 mix on a heater and also the handle. I apply two-three coats leaving 24hrs (depending on temp) and
use wet & dry between coats.
You can get a lovely glass finish and it's very tough/durable.

I've just modified a shoot through to over the top by capping the forks with Yew. I decided to coat
using the above treatment because it was not seasoned quite long enough (about 4 years only) and
developed a couple of fine cracks. It has soaked in nicely and stabilised the wood.

I'm just about to post my mofication attempt here if you want to see the result. I've not been as careful as I can be
but you can see the potential.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top