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Grandpa Pete
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have lived a long time and have accumulated a pretty large collection of tools. Some of them work better than other. A few of them just seem to be special. No doubt a lot of you folks have a tool that you love. Perhaps it was handed down to you by your grandfather or maybe it's your go to tool because it works so well. Here is one of mine, a Swedish carving hatchet. It has a very sexy shape that fits my hand and allows me to control every stoke. The steel is of excellent quality, takes a razor edge and keeps it.

Show me your favorite tool.
 

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aka CYBORG
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One semester in a 90's welding lab, I cold bent 55 of these rebar hack saws. I kept this first one which also did the cutting for all the others. They cut like 'butta' due to heft and tension. Looking back, it's hard to believe how much steel I've cut with this. I sold a few but gave most away ... still get requests for them.

To change blades, I would clamp the handle in a vise and pull down from the top. That releases the tension just enough on the 1/8" stainless pins to push them out and replace the blade. Now I use a long bar clamp to compress the frame a little and relieve the tension for blade changes.
 

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One semester in a 90's welding lab, I cold bent 55 of these rebar hack saws. I kept this first one which also did the cutting for all the others. They cut like 'butta' due to heft and tension. Looking back, it's hard to believe how much steel I've cut with this. I sold a few but gave most away ... still get requests for them.

To change blades, I would clamp the handle in a vise and pull down from the top. That releases the tension just enough on the 1/8" stainless pins to push them out and replace the blade. Now I use a long bar clamp to compress the frame a little and relieve the tension for blade changes.
Can't beat a homemade tool. That hack saw will go forever.
 

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Grandpa Pete
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One semester in a 90's welding lab, I cold bent 55 of these rebar hack saws. I kept this first one which also did the cutting for all the others. They cut like 'butta' due to heft and tension. Looking back, it's hard to believe how much steel I've cut with this. I sold a few but gave most away ... still get requests for them.

To change blades, I would clamp the handle in a vise and pull down from the top. That releases the tension just enough on the 1/8" stainless pins to push them out and replace the blade. Now I use a long bar clamp to compress the frame a little and relieve the tension for blade changes.
I am with Grumpy. Tools you made yourself are really special. When a tool has a story it's a lot more meaningful. I have several knifes, some old and some I've made. I have taken to writing their story on the back of the sheaths, e.g. "Made on my first trip to Alaska 1980. Found a bone in the ocean in Sika and made the handle from it. Cut down a long blade to fit the handle. First try at scrimshaw, copied old Yupik design." Hopefully it will mean something to a grandson or granddaughter some day.
 

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One semester in a 90's welding lab, I cold bent 55 of these rebar hack saws. I kept this first one which also did the cutting for all the others. They cut like 'butta' due to heft and tension. Looking back, it's hard to believe how much steel I've cut with this. I sold a few but gave most away ... still get requests for them.

To change blades, I would clamp the handle in a vise and pull down from the top. That releases the tension just enough on the 1/8" stainless pins to push them out and replace the blade. Now I use a long bar clamp to compress the frame a little and relieve the tension for blade changes.
Nice! my 90's welding lab was pretty boring, we did not get to do neat projects like this. I can just imagine the way that must cut though, rock solid for sure :)
 
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aka CYBORG
Joined
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2,060 Posts
One semester in a 90's welding lab, I cold bent 55 of these rebar hack saws. I kept this first one which also did the cutting for all the others. They cut like 'butta' due to heft and tension. Looking back, it's hard to believe how much steel I've cut with this. I sold a few but gave most away ... still get requests for them.

To change blades, I would clamp the handle in a vise and pull down from the top. That releases the tension just enough on the 1/8" stainless pins to push them out and replace the blade. Now I use a long bar clamp to compress the frame a little and relieve the tension for blade changes.
Nice! my 90's welding lab was pretty boring, we did not get to do neat projects like this. I can just imagine the way that must cut though, rock solid for sure :)
The first semester was half classroom and half lab with assignments. After that, you could sign up for just lab every semester, so I did ... for 18 years. Made anything I wanted, the instructors only wanted to see drawings ahead of time, and later didn't even bother with that. I made a ton of stuff, had access to free steel and a half million dollar welding lab and machine shop, all for $40 a semester. Good times for sure.
 

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Grandpa Pete
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a similar deal. I have access to a wonderful shop at the school where I used to teach. My home workshop is well equip but it's really nice to have access to the larger equipment when needed. The only issue is the fact that some of the newest equipment requires computer input and is a bit above my technical pay grade. Thankfully the guy who is now in charge of the shop is always willing to help the old guy out.

GP
 

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My favourite outdoors tool is this. A "Duku Chandong" parang. I love its shape and heft. Not too heavy and nimble in hand - it can be confidently swung. It's a hand forged carbon steel blade that has been zone hardened. Made in Malaysia and local for me! I keep the lower portion razor sharp for whittling/carving while the upper chopping zone is given a convex edge for the rough stuff. If I had to choose only thing to bring with me, it'd be this blade.
41ecfeca61928254fb6d8fa7097d40cd.jpg
 

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My favourite outdoors tool is this. A "Duku Chandong" parang. I love its shape and heft. Not too heavy and nimble in hand - it can be confidently swung. It's a hand forged carbon steel blade that has been zone hardened. Made in Malaysia and local for me! I keep the lower portion razor sharp for whittling/carving while the upper chopping zone is given a convex edge for the rough stuff. If I had to choose only thing to bring with me, it'd be this blade.
41ecfeca61928254fb6d8fa7097d40cd.jpg
Nice blade, I am sure one could get some work done with that beauty :)
 

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It may seem weird but my head lamp I picked up for free with a coupon from Harbor Freight is one of my most used tools. As I have aged I just can't see details in low light like I did when I was younger. I break out the light for all of my fine or detailed work be it wood work or mechanical stuff. It is just so handy to have an aim-able light source that does not encumber your hands :)
 

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Grandpa Pete
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My favourite outdoors tool is this. A "Duku Chandong" parang. I love its shape and heft. Not too heavy and nimble in hand - it can be confidently swung. It's a hand forged carbon steel blade that has been zone hardened. Made in Malaysia and local for me! I keep the lower portion razor sharp for whittling/carving while the upper chopping zone is given a convex edge for the rough stuff. If I had to choose only thing to bring with me, it'd be this blade.
41ecfeca61928254fb6d8fa7097d40cd.jpg
Nice blade, I am sure one could get some work done with that beauty :)
Thats a nice looking blade......I like the shape a lot
 

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Grandpa Pete
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It may seem weird but my head lamp I picked up for free with a coupon from Harbor Freight is one of my most used tools. As I have aged I just can't see details in low light like I did when I was younger. I break out the light for all of my fine or detailed work be it wood work or mechanical stuff. It is just so handy to have an aim-able light source that does not encumber your hands :)
I just got a headlamp as a birthday gift. Haven't tried it yet. I was only thinking of it as something to use when walking the dog at night ut I can see how it would be helpful when working on detailed craft projects.
 

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Here is my favorite Leatherman Surge.

No multitool can change an individual tool, but when your pickup is limited in space this little guy comes in handy. It serves me for about 8 years. However, Leatherman promises 25 year for it to work.

https://wildproofgear.com/best-edc-multitools/

There are more budget-friendly SOG and Gerber multitools but Leatherman is something that will do its job for sure.

leatherman-surge.png
 

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My homemade hand wood router, shaper for reproduction of antique mouldings, you cut the profile blade byhand then reproduce the unique shape.

Made from a single section of desert ironwood and bronze PB 102 alloy, she can be adjusted to cut at any angle left or right for that odd shape you cannot buy off of the shelf.

49974375418_606dc0de8a_b.jpg20160923_105136 by Shed Life, on Flickr

49974898071_6f90277182_b.jpg20160923_105151 by Shed Life, on Flickr
 

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My homemade hand wood router, shaper for reproduction of antique mouldings, you cut the profile blade byhand then reproduce the unique shape.
Made from a single section of desert ironwood and bronze PB 102 alloy, she can be adjusted to cut at any angle left or right for that odd shape you cannot buy off of the shelf.

49974375418_606dc0de8a_b.jpg20160923_105136 by Shed Life, on Flickr

49974898071_6f90277182_b.jpg20160923_105151 by Shed Life, on Flickr
That is so cool!!
 
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