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Balls:
Lead
PROS: This is the second heaviest ammo that you can use. It is very popular because of its weight and softness. Due to its being so soft it does not ricochet much, but delivers most of the impact energy directly into the target. The increased weight helps flight characteristics and energy delivered on impact.
CONS: The metal is toxic to humans. The lead absorption is greater in slingshot shooters than gun owners due to more direct handling of the metal. With guns people usually grasp the brass shell not the lead projectile. The softness of the metal is also a con because a lead ball is usually not reusable because of impact deformation. Also, some of the impact energy is absorbed into the metal during impact deformation. The softness also can reduce piercing depth of the target. Lead also is not usually produced at as high of tolerance levels at other materials which can effect its accuracy(steel and tungsten are usually high grade ball bearings).

Steel
PROS: Steel is the most popular slingshot ammunition out there. It has medium weight and good flight characteristics. It's hardness allows good target penetration. It is also an inexpensive ammunition. It is usually reusable after firing.
CONS: The hardness causes significant ricochet when striking other hard objects.

White Glass Marbles
PROS: This is generally considered a great target ammo due to its high visibility in flight. Historically it has been a very inexpensive option and are easy to recover for reuse after being shot.
CONS: The hardness and elasticity of the glass makes for ricochet after being fired. Recently the cost has increased due to manufacturing limitations of white glass. It has also become more scarce to find.

Tungsten Carbide
PROS: This is the heaviest ammo that you can use. It is 1.7-1.8x the weight of lead. The increased weight helps flight characteristics and energy delivered on impact. You can also go to a smaller (faster due to less drag) projectile with the same weight as a larger lead ball. At this time it is considered non-toxic. The metal is quite hard, which will give you increased depth of penetration on impact.
CONS: The price of Tungsten Carbide is quite high as it is an exotic metal.

Copper
PROS: Copper is heavier and softer than steel. It has good flight characteristics and is a compromise between transferred impact energy and penetration. It is non-toxic. It will ricochet less than steel but more than lead. It has good visibility due to its color.
CONS: It is very hard to find in sizes larger than 1/4", and is more expensive than steel. If not kept dry has a tendency to corrode.

Other Shapes
Hex Nuts
PROS: Some prefer this for hunting because they tend to shred the target on impact. They are generally made of steel. They can be very inexpensive.
CONS: They are usually light since they have a thread hole in the center. They have poor flight characteristics due to their poor aerodynamics.

Metal Cubes
PROS: Some prefer this for hunting because they tend to shred the target on impact. They can come in many different metals including tungsten.
CONS: They have poor flight characteristics due to their bad aerodynamics.

NOTE: This is a list of the commercially available ammo types. If anyone has any additions please reply. Also reply if you are aware of any non-commercial types.
 

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Do marbles ahd the smal chartersics as white glass?
anyplace in wolverham,pton to buy steel balls?
Thanks
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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I've heard people cut chunks of rebar with bolt cutters for close range hunting also, but I've never tried it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do marbles ahd the smal chartersics as white glass?
anyplace in wolverham,pton to buy steel balls?
Thanks
Sorry, I was not clear in my post. I have edited it for clarity. The White Glass is in fact white marbles.

I recommend buying them online. Much cheaper. Also, you can probably buy them locally from a mechanical supply house.
 

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I used to hunt with lead egg sinkers. They did a good job.
 

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Do marbles ahd the smal chartersics as white glass?
anyplace in wolverham,pton to buy steel balls?
Thanks
Sorry, I was not clear in my post. I have edited it for clarity. The White Glass is in fact white marbles.

I recommend buying them online. Much cheaper. Also, you can probably buy them locally from a mechanical supply house.
[/quote]
Thanks now sum more glass bottle will come to thier death muwhahahaha
 

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Clay.


Clay ammo shoots pretty straight, is biodegradable, shatters on inpact on a hard surface so recoils are never a problem.
Also: the weight of a clay 14mm ball is 3gramms after a week drying, comperable to 9mm steel balls
Makes great ammo for children, they have small hands to make clay balls :3
Worthless for hunting anyting but ants.
 

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There's no special kind needed, but you'll probably want air-dry clay. Check any hobby store you have in the area.

Tip: It dries faster with a paper towel beneath the balls. Don't even need to rotate them!
 

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I disagree on some points about lead balls. I believe the toxicity is greatly overrated, and the dangers from simply handling lead are very small. I've been handling and shooting lead for many years with no ill effects. I reuse lead balls many times. The only times I have to recast them is when I miss my backstop and hit the concrete wall. I consider pure lead too soft for anything except muzzle loading firearms, but wheel weights are cheap and about the right hardness for handguns or slingshots. While true that soft ammo can deform and expend some energy in the process, I don't consider it a problem to be concerned with, especially at slingshot velocities. I am old enough to have shot ducks and geese with lead, and consider steel to be a poor substitute for lead for hunting. As to accuracy with a slingshot, I doubt seriously that more than a small handful of slingshooters can take advantage of the higher precision of a ball bearing.

Thanks for starting this discussion.

Henry

Balls:
Lead
PROS: This is the second heaviest ammo that you can use. It is very popular because of its weight and softness. Due to its being so soft it does not ricochet much, but delivers most of the impact energy directly into the target. The increased weight helps flight characteristics and energy delivered on impact.
CONS: The metal is toxic to humans. The lead absorption is greater in slingshot shooters than gun owners due to more direct handling of the metal. With guns people usually grasp the brass shell not the lead projectile. The softness of the metal is also a con because a lead ball is usually not reusable because of impact deformation. Also, some of the impact energy is absorbed into the metal during impact deformation. The softness also can reduce piercing depth of the target. Lead also is not usually produced at as high of tolerance levels at other materials which can effect its accuracy(steel and tungsten are usually high grade ball bearings).
 

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You forgot that hex nuts can be powered-up by fitting a small piece of lead sinker in the middle. Cons, a lot of work to prepare; inconsistent flight path (I've never shot one at long range, so I'm not really sure, the increased weight negates wind resistance a bit)
 

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Good thread Aaron!!

But don't count out stones in this one!



Cheers - John
 

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Hexnuts are excellent hunting ammo and the heavier hexnut has good flight on into 30 yards.

Pros the impact of a hexnut is what makes it deadly not the shredding which is more like a bonus effect they are lethal to furry creatures like rabbits and squirrels regardless of which side impacts as they have not protection to absorb the impact.

The cons are the hole/flat side can be rendered innefective if you hit a large feathered fowl in a heavily feathered area it will absorb the impact. This is largely due to their shape, yet you can kill anything with hexnuts provided your accuracy is outstanding you can take the feathers with Head shots. Hexnuts are my second purchasable/scroungable hunting ammo after round and oval smooth stones.

Nico
 

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Not a legitimate option for hunting anything larger than small birds, I've found small hard candies to be fun to shoot. I use "everlasting gobstoppers."

Pros: cheap $.99 box of about 100, low richochet chances because they explode on impact with hard objects, brightly colored, biodegradable

Cons: average flight characteristics, light per volume
 

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HOBBYIST-SOPHOMORIC-JACKA$$
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How bout paintballs? I only ask cause ive been shooting them a lot lately. and i like the fact that they mark the hit spot. Candies like peanut m&m's vs regular. or milk duds vs raisinets. even used to shoot parts of the porcelin (?) from spark plugs.
 

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.44cal lead is awesome hunting ammo, just bought (60) 44cal leadball sinkers from a fishing store. Will go back for another 100, they are fine hunting ammo.
 

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i use small planets for ammo.
 
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