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Def NOT a veteran shooter, but I usually build mine with sloped tips, as I feel it helps prolong band longevity / life ?
I just figure latex stretching over a smooth, rounded over surface has got to be easier on it than over a sharp and flat edge
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That was the only thing I was thinking was having less contact with the bands. Most of my bands fail at the pouch. Well I guess I will see when my gzk yeyan arrives
 

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I prefer to have my fork tips thin, so that there is as little rubber as possible stretching over them. Sometimes I will make them tapered, but usually I just leave them flat and as thin as I think is safe with the material I am using. It doesn't seem to prolong my band life, since I usually shoot tapers and my bands almost always fail near the pouch, but It feels much smoother to draw IMO.
 

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I like sloped tips but they are not a must for me provided the tips are not to chunky. I'll shoot straight or sloped but I probably prefer sloped. Anything between a 10 to 15 degree slope angle works for me.

I think there are two, maybe three advantages with sloped tips? The first one is the perceived advantage of having less contact area with the bands. I think it feels smoother and lighter to draw because of the reduced friction. I don't have any experimental comparison to back this up so it's just an impression. It might also enhance bandset longevity but I don't know for sure? For me, the smoother, lighter feeling draw is its main appeal. I will add that the contact edge should be gently rounded over so it won't cut but not too much or it might throw off shots.

The second possible advantage is shooter specific. Sloped tips allow for forward canted or straighter wrist shooting. So if you tend to forward cant a little then sloped tips will be more forgiving. However, If you don't forward cant and hold your frame square, the sloped tips won't make much difference other than reducing band contact. You can shoot sloped tips holding the frame square. It makes no difference imho. I will also add that whether you forward cant a frame depends on the rest of the frame design also - how the swells are implemented and the shaping at the pinch area will influence how a frame sits into the hand.

Thirdly, though this is not really just about sloped tips, is that a thinner fork tip profile is preferable by most shooters (I think). We just don't like seeing chunky tips, probably because they just feel clumsy? Thinner tips seem much cleaner and feel more agile and I think this influences accuracy by not contributing to the mental detraction of clumsy chunkiness? Thinner tips feel just surer to aim and sloped tips assist with the illusion that tips are thin even though they may not be... So, sloped tips can be a good solution to maintain frame strength.

For me, the fatter the tips are the more of a factor sloping will be - thin profile tips don't need to be sloped but thicker frames, e.g. those that are about 3/4", is better sloped (for me anyway). If I am building a frame thicker than 1/2", I'll usually slope them.

Anyway, these are just my random thoughts on appreciating tips!

I had a typo on the word "tips" earlier... a "p" became a "t" and it made for some mind bending reading lol!

Have a good day everyone.
 

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My key priority with fork tips is safety, both in terms of thickness to ensure that nothing breaks under repeated tension of bands and/or tubes, and the attachment method used - particularly with emphasis on slingshot frames made of wood, where the type of wood and its thickness are a determining factor.

Thin fork tips are on the whole safe on steel-based slingshots, but other materials, even aluminum, do require caution in my opinion. Rearward sloping fork tips require wood to be either thick enough, or strengthened by means of a metal core in the overall frame: I would choose the latter option. Bear in mind that fork tip attachment grooves (wrap & tuck method) also reduce fork tip thickness (strength) before you opt for sloping upper fork tip surfaces.

The point of highest friction is the edge where flat bands loop over the fork tips under tension, and this needs to be perfectly rounded and smooth to avoid perforation or tearing. All in all, rearward sloping fork tips make sense, as they should technically reduce friction between the bands and the top surface of the fork tips: as how significant this actually is would need to be ascertained by filming with as slow-mo camera.

In terms of fork tip shapes, a linear shape on the leading edge of the fork tips ensures that bands fly straight after the release, and thus better accuracy. It seems to me that so-called "peg head" fork tips can disturb the linear forward motion of bands, because the flat band surfaces are not necessarily centered on the peg heads when the bands are drawn back, and subsequently less potential accuracy.
 

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Usually build mine flat and as thin as possible with the band grooves as high as possible.
If I were building for a person that tilted his frame forward towards the target I might slope them.
Great question though cause it does make a difference on a thicker fork tip.
Enjoyed every ones answers on this one.
 

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I experimented pointing a frame towards the target once and subsequently drove a 9.5mm into the back of my hand. Then I played with a HareSplitter for awhile until I figured out what wasn't happening with the angle of my dangle. Now I've stopped thinking I can figure it out on my own and do my YouTube homework first!

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The point of highest friction is the edge where flat bands loop over the fork tips under tension, and this needs to be perfectly rounded and smooth to avoid perforation or tearing. All in all, rearward sloping fork tips make sense, as they should technically reduce friction between the bands and the top surface of the fork tips: as how significant this actually is would need to be ascertained by filming with as slow-mo camera.
Does anyone (ahem..) lubricate their tips?

On a non-porous OTT frame you could do this with silicone grease which wouldn't damage the rubber provided it has no added silicone.

You could even use latex condom lubricant.

/ more smut than this thread needs cos' it already has enough with mixing-up tips t's and p's :p
 

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I fully agree with the 2 shooters (Urban & Pebble) above & also Mo.. guid points made !

I think it's really doon tae how ye shoot & whit benefits we consider when making/using oor slings.

I'm in the sling, flats 90掳 held 90掳 & no canted (I micht waver occassionaly.) I'm no intae coefficients of friction but nearly fell on ma erse twice this mornin.. icey. So understanding!

Enjoyed reading this yin! Thanks

:)
 

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The point of highest friction is the edge where flat bands loop over the fork tips under tension, and this needs to be perfectly rounded and smooth to avoid perforation or tearing. All in all, rearward sloping fork tips make sense, as they should technically reduce friction between the bands and the top surface of the fork tips: as how significant this actually is would need to be ascertained by filming with as slow-mo camera.
Does anyone (ahem..) lubricate their tips?

On a non-porous OTT frame you could do this with silicone grease which wouldn't damage the rubber provided it has no added silicone.

You could even use latex condom lubricant.

/ more smut than this thread needs cos' it already has enough with mixing-up tips t's and p's :p
:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

I have never thought that :p
 

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Def NOT a veteran shooter, but I usually build mine with sloped tips, as I feel it helps prolong band longevity / life ?
I just figure latex stretching over a smooth, rounded over surface has got to be easier on it than over a sharp and flat edge
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
That was the only thing I was thinking was having less contact with the bands. Most of my bands fail at the pouch. Well I guess I will see when my gzk yeyan arrives
It is good that bands fails at the pouch. If You use much longer pouch that Your fork gap is, it can wear out Your band faster.

Many times, when I have read or watched something sloped tips related, it usually is hit to hand or to the forks. Sloped tips shooters think, that forks should be tilted forward and then there is no sloped tips a"dvantage".

My opinion is, sloped tips=less friction at the forks and better accuracy theoretically.
 
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