Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fairly new @ this ,,,About 6 months of practice & a couple of new frames (thank you Bill & Nathan).. ' Have a 3 cm & 6 cm spinner @ 10 meters...…….

Best so far is 14 out of 50 shots on the 3cm...……..& 25 out of 50 on the 6cm...…..

Feeling like - not improving , but wondering if 'too much impatient....

'Want to hit that thang ' bout every time...………

Jus keep shooting to get better ? That's what I'm thinking - Don't think there are any shortcuts to this???...

Advice appreciated...……….
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,864 Posts
Counting and keeping track of hits, misses, and percentages puts unneeded stress on yourself....then it can work against you....truths me....I've been there....just shoot and have fun....you'll eventually hit more often and miss less often just from shooting all the time.....and your progress will be more constant I do you are enjoying it more....
Be patient and don't put so much pressure on yourself!!!

MW

Sent from my B3-A40 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,864 Posts
Thanks MW …………
I'll keep shooting...………..
Your very welcome....
we all want to hit the small target every time...and we all miss....even the best of the best..

Keep slinging... and smiling while your doin it :)

Sent from my B3-A40 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
There are so many variables w slingshots, and each variable creates its own opportunity for a miss.

Practice w/ just one slingshot and really master it - I am concentrating on a PP Hathcock Target Sniper (a gift from The Norseman)

Hand grip strength is important - I squeeze handgrippers to build up my hand strength

Form is important - if you are not familiar w/ it, look up archer's T-stance - feet parallel, hip to target, good posture, hold in your stomach, etc.

Make sure you have the right band set for your ammo

Make sure the ammo is properly seated in the pouch

Grip and release is critical - I am working on this so no advice other than read what others have written

maintain your form until the shot hits the target - no peeking!

shoot paper - that way you can see your mistakes

take your time - remember to breathe and most of all

have fun!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
Fairly new @ this ,,,About 6 months of practice & a couple of new frames (thank you Bill & Nathan).. ' Have a 3 cm & 6 cm spinner @ 10 meters...…….

Best so far is 14 out of 50 shots on the 3cm...……..& 25 out of 50 on the 6cm...…..

Feeling like - not improving , but wondering if 'too much impatient....

'Want to hit that thang ' bout every time...………

Jus keep shooting to get better ? That's what I'm thinking - Don't think there are any shortcuts to this???...

Advice appreciated...……….
Shoot at smaller targets... You're shooting at 30mm now, go to 20mm or tie a knot in paracord and shoot at that if 20mm is to big.

Slow down...

Shoot like you've got only one shot... control the slingshot, don't let it control you... You know the basics, make an effort to work on them at every practice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,289 Posts
Yeah, I am with Hoggy...what all them fellors said.

Here is what happens to me. I like to keep records... but when I started getting frustrated I just hang a can and shoot it a bunch.

Then I go back to shoot small, miss small. Some of my most fun shoots lately have been a whole lot of near misses at smaller targets.

Then I hang a 12 oz can and eat it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Actually there is a great shortcut. It's not an easy one, as it requires that you do have a solid foundation first.
Here is what I did, and got much much better after 7 months of everyday practice. In fact, I managed to achieve the consistency required, by me, to be content with my shooting.
It's very simple really, but because it is counter intuitive, I believe many shooters struggle because they are not following it.
So, assume your normal stance, normal shooting sequence, everything exactly the same as you always do, and shoot. Wether you hit or miss, change NOTHING, don't adjust your aim, your anchor, your head tilt etc, change NOTHING. Keep on shooting for the day. The next day do the same, and even if you find it hard to hit the target, keep on doing what you did the previous day in an extremely STUBBORN way and dont count hits and misses.
Do this every day, the exact same movements, not caring about hitting or missing, care only about your form and shot sequence, and keep it the same no matter what, even after 20 shots that went 2" to the right.
I'll be honest, resisting the urge to make minute adjustments to correct our shots is very hard, but I did my best to try it, it took me one full week to master this simple thing, but after that week, I made a huge jump in consistency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,219 Posts
MakoPat beat me to it, when I feel I can't hit a smaller target, I'll hang a beer can and take out my frustrations. BAM ... BAM ... BAM
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
It's easier to hit the bullseye if you don't "TRY" to hit the target
I'll tell you what.... when I really really try to hit the bullseye, when it really matters to me... the single thing that helps me the most is to simply hold on the bullseye... don't release as soon as the alignment happens, but instead just hold it there... controlling my slingshot, controlling my urge to release, controlling my body, and controlling my mind...

When I'm actually in control, I rarely miss.

Then there's variables which might not be under my control... wind, temperature, light value, distance markers, tiny tiny differences between one bandset to the next... and so forth and so on... BUT when I control the vast majority.... it's an almost Zen like state... everything works, all is in harmony... and I feel.. satisfied... then my target is hit!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all responses...

' Intend to focus more - aim small-shoot small - & shoot a lot....

Thanks again.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
It's easier to hit the bullseye if you don't "TRY" to hit the target
I'll tell you what.... when I really really try to hit the bullseye, when it really matters to me... the single thing that helps me the most is to simply hold on the bullseye... don't release as soon as the alignment happens, but instead just hold it there... controlling my slingshot, controlling my urge to release, controlling my body, and controlling my mind...

When I'm actually in control, I rarely miss.

Then there's variables which might not be under my control... wind, temperature, light value, distance markers, tiny tiny differences between one bandset to the next... and so forth and so on... BUT when I control the vast majority.... it's an almost Zen like state... everything works, all is in harmony... and I feel.. satisfied... then my target is hit!
And remember to keep holding on the target after you release and until the ammo hits the target - I am working on the follow-through part of my shot sequence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
In addition to the very relevant advice given by Blue Raja, strengthening the slingshot holding arm with exercise elastics and weights will help you to improve stability while aiming: fatigue is always a problem, but it can be delayed by ten minutes of daily exercises.

Holding your breath just before you release the pouch also helps: this technique is used by firearms shooters.

For me, a constant anchor point e.g. the cheekbone, will ensure both a constant draw weight and a similar aiming configuration for each shot - a bit like archery, where the string touches the tip of the nose for that very purpose. You will see a marked improvement in your shot grouping, guaranteed.

The Chinese team at the international slingshot tournament in Italy back in June 2018 all used a steady anchor point - they won the competition.

Floating anchor points for more power (semi or full butterfly-style) are, in my opinion, best left aside until the shooting technique with a constant anchor point is fully mastered. Least but not last, analyze every single shot to understand why you either hit the target, or why you missed it. These thought processes will eventually become second nature, almost like a mental check-list prior to releasing the pouch - along with much better results.

Whatever you do, have some fun while shooting: nail a shaken coke can or something with "special effects" when hit... :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
117 Posts
In addition to the very relevant advice given by Blue Raja, strengthening the slingshot holding arm with exercise elastics and weights will help you to improve stability while aiming: fatigue is always a problem, but it can be delayed by ten minutes of daily exercises.

Holding your breath just before you release the pouch also helps: this technique is used by firearms shooters.

For me, a constant anchor point e.g. the cheekbone, will ensure both a constant draw weight and a similar aiming configuration for each shot - a bit like archery, where the string touches the tip of the nose for that very purpose. You will see a marked improvement in your shot grouping, guaranteed.

The Chinese team at the international slingshot tournament in Italy back in June 2018 all used a steady anchor point - they won the competition.

Floating anchor points for more power (semi or full butterfly-style) are, in my opinion, best left aside until the shooting technique with a constant anchor point is fully mastered. Least but not last, analyze every single shot to understand why you either hit the target, or why you missed it. These thought processes will eventually become second nature, almost like a mental check-list prior to releasing the pouch - along with much better results.

Whatever you do, have some fun while shooting: nail a shaken coke can or something with "special effects" when hit... :D
I exercise my hold hand regularly. I have a 3x5 card on a table that has the following listed ; stance ( I have duct tape on the floor for consistent feet placement, grip,fork alignment, draw,band alignment, anchor point,release, follow through. I am very careful to place the ammo in the pouch and hold it the same for each shot. At be present I see no advantage to semi or full butterfly improving consistent accuracy, which is all I care about. I've tried several meditation practices over the years including Zazen (Zen) Mindfulness and a couple of martial arts: Shorinryu Karate and Tae Leon Do. Bill is right, slingshot shooting, if done deliberately is a Zen practice. At least for me it is. Make that Tae Kwon Do
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Might consider putting a 3/4" avery dot centered on each of your target spinners.

Also what Skropi said, with the added feature of putting a cardboard or corrigated plastic sign, box, sheet or other device behind and near the target to record your misses.

Change that backstop out every 100 shots or so.

After you have a small but recognizable pattern on that I would then and only then adjust your aim reference to whatever was lined up with the center of your tight pattern while you were uniformly missing and creating that tight off target pattern.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top