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HOLD-FAST
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Made this oak natty for shootin single tubes.
The gets a little too hot in the microwave i think ;-)
 

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Super Moderator
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I do 45sec with at least 30min intervals on the lowest setting (defrost) I also place in a plastic bag between bakes. I'll shorten the bakes as the wood gets dryer. Takes a good few cycles though and I'll do the rough work right after the bakes and and limit the time working to a few minutes. Until its completely dry of course. You also need to keep an eye out for checking and cracks the whole time. Its so easy to over cook and force moisture out too rapidly from the centre.

Great looking frame though - nice work. Personally I'd add some small holes to do a snared wrap and tuck.
 

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HOLD-FAST
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, the microwave... i should be smarter after all that burned forks but still not a guy who's known for being patient :)

Small holes may also work fine but i like the clean look and just wrap as on my pfs.
 

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I don't know about ovens but microwaves work by boiling out the water fast so the wood won't split. It's very easy to overdo it though. It is easy to burn and even catch your frame on fire. When I think of microwaves I think about how they heat up the water molecules and leave everything else alone. It doesn't work that way though. The wood reacts. A number of years ago I was shooting my favorite slingshot at the time when I got a fork hit. The fork that was hit popped right off and inside the whole thing was charcoal. I use about half power and do it for twenty seconds at a time, cooling in between spurts.
 

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You can boil them. Like literally in water. I know it sounds nuts, but it works.
 

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Amateur
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That's a beauty. I had no idea you could microwave your forks to dry them out. Do ovens work (for those of us without microwaves)?
I had a friend that years ago worked in an environmental lab that had huge drying ovens for drying out biomass samples for different purposes. I think they ran at 60 - 65 degrees Celsius and they would leave the samples in the ovens for several days to a week or more to make sure all traces of moisture were removed.

I never got a chance to use their ovens for drying forks, but I bet they would have worked great.
 

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Mojave Mo
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I flushed my keys down the toilet a few days ago (I believe there is a photo) and ultimately fished them out and dried the e-key in a bag a rice.
So if I had access to 1000lbs of rice, how long would it take to dry out my fork?

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 
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