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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Started working on the log I posted in "Woodpile find". At first it was looking promising. Got the bark off and started working my way down.

kbarwood.jpeg

Then when I got to this section, it was pretty wet. Big hunks came away.

wetwood.jpeg

I think there is plenty of meat left to turn out a frame. Would you recommend letting it sit to dry out, or get past the wet stuff and see what's underneath? Thanks!
 

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Ray Rowden
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I'd dig into the wet stuff and get rid of it.

But I don't have the skills to stabilize punky wood.

If you can stabilize it, it may be worth letting it dry.

Personally, I prefer cutting out the bad stuff and replacing it, if needed to maintain the form and strength. I don't worry about making an invisible patch.

Osage2.JPG

Osage4.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I dug into it. The wet stuff was pretty invasive so I trimmed it away and this is where I ended up. Going to try for a La Cholita by Henry in Panama. The wood still feels a bit damp to the touch, so I might try a little microwave drying. I think this will end up being more of a learning experience than anything else. All that moister made for some nice spalting!

stencil.jpeg
 

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I don't know how well it will work on a piece of this size, but I regularly stabilize knife scale size pieces of heavily spalted wood, using a long food saver bag and 1 hour epoxy thinned out. I put a few tablespoons into the bottom of the bag, put the DRY wood in there. Fold up a couple paper towels to block the epoxy from getting sucked into the food saver. *This is key * if you don't want to be purchasing a new food saver. Anyway, let it rip. the food saver sucks out all the air and epoxy fills the voids. seal it. Let it dry, peel the bag away and trim the dried epoxy. Again, I don't know how this might work on such a large piece but it is an idea for a starting point.
 

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Hi String,

Just by where you're at right now based on that picture, I would say with that grain, this fork is gonna have a nice finish on it. That stuff you had in the beginning of the carve-the dark veins and marks- are called Spalt. They are one of the early stages of rot. That's why it was coming off in chunks and punky like. Spalt, at the right stage of decay is very prized by woodworkers because of the weird ( and very cool ) grain patterns that come out when a finish is added. Good luck with the rest of your build. Looks to me like it is gonna be a stunner.
 

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I have a question for this prosess. When you have a piece of wood, how big a difference is it if you stabilize it or just fill the gaps and what not with epoxy and let it cure. Is there a need for stabilizing? What drawbacks does epoxying have to stabilizing?

So what i rly want to know is: Are epoxying enough?

/Uba
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Got it shaped a bit more.

firstrough.jpeg

Only problem is that when I got through the CA, it started to chunk off again. It's really soft, like a cross between bass wood and balsa. it's in the handle a bit too. I'm afraid it won't be a shooter, but I am learning a lot.

tearout.jpeg

And after a bit more refinement...

secondrough.jpeg

I am not too upset if I can't shoot it. At least I know that I can turn out a somewhat slingshot shaped thing! Learning a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Looking really good! While it's still pretty chunky, you could slice it in half and glue in a thin cutting board core plastic/bamboo. Then it wouldn't matter how soft the wood was......just a thought
Thanks, bro!

I was thinking of doing that, but just afraid if I hit a soft spot through the handle it might take a bad turn. I don't have a bandsaw so would have to cut it by hand and not a lot of room for error.
 

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Looking really good! While it's still pretty chunky, you could slice it in half and glue in a thin cutting board core plastic/bamboo. Then it wouldn't matter how soft the wood was......just a thought
Thanks, bro!

I was thinking of doing that, but just afraid if I hit a soft spot through the handle it might take a bad turn. I don't have a bandsaw so would have to cut it by hand and not a lot of room for error.
I know, it makes it hard when you don't have band saw. I don't have one either, and I've been playing around with an idea for a natty and I had to saw it down the middle. I just used a nice sharp fine tooth handsaw. Worked rather well......just have to go real slow and careful lol.
 

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Here is another thought.. There is a product called Cactus Juice. It is what wood workers use to stabilize wood. Normally they use a vacuum chamber to suck the product into the pours of the wood. But you could put the fork in a shallow pan, put enough weight on it to hold it down and cover it with the juice. Let it set for a few days while you think about the joys of slinging. Take it out and pop into an oven at 200F for a couple hours. Wife will be delighted with the smell. I picked up a toaster oven at Good Will for 5 bucks. this should do a fair job of hardening the soft stuff.
 
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