Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a new shooter,and as such, I am in the process of exploring all the various techniques and styles of shooting the slingshot.
My recent exposure to instinctive shooting made me think hard, and I've reached some conclusions.
What follows is my opinion only, based on my own experience, and also based on conversations I've had with Bill Hays and Nathan Masters, two shooters I greatly respect, and consider good examples of two very different approaches to shooting.
Let me start by saying that those two approaches, aiming and instinctive shooting, are in fact the same thing. There is no aiming, and there is no instinctive.
I call aiming differently, I call it conscious aiming, and instinctive I call intuitive aiming. That's for the sake of the conversation.
Every shot we take with the slingshot is an excersise in repetivity, which holds true for both styles, and a conscious effort to aim, or line everything up, contrary to focusing solely on the target, disregarding the frame, and letting the brain take control of our body posture to achieve a hit.
In both case we do aim, but using a different approach to achieve it.
There's no other way to explain why I do ok shooting intuitively, without even caring where the frame is.
And that takes me to the gist of the matter. Why do some people prefer one way over the other? Why do some people find it impossible to shoot one way in favour of the other?
I came to realise that the culprit is simply the power of habit. We get used to one thing, and we distrust that which we think is it's opposite, in essence denying ourselves the understanding that all forms of shooting the slingshot are one and the same.
We shoot for so long, using only one technique, that we become inflexible.
The proof for that is that me, a new shooter, with barely 6-7 months of shooting, with no standard way of doing things, exactly because I am new, find that shooting either way is equally effective. Ttf Vs ott, instinctive Vs aiming, all the same.
I don't know how I hit things intuitively, I don't know how I can adjust my POI, as I don't know why I miss when hard aiming. In fact I know that my release is the culprit, but that's another story, you get the meaning.
Anyway, I may be totally wrong, I haven't read any books, I shoot for only a few months, but this little experience I have, along with my conversations with much better shooters than I am, led me to these conclusions.

Ps. I still can't decide how the heck to shoot, intuitive aiming or hard aiming....God I don't like dillemas, so today I shot a few shots one way, a few the other, with different frames of course. Yeah, dont ask, I am completely undecided because everything works.

Thanks all for reading and putting up with me guys. I know I can become a bit boring, but slingshots is my only past time, I simply enjoy them so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
Hi Skorpi,

A couple things I discovered during my research.

- there is only a limited time to maintain concentration. if the conscious part is too long you may loose track. it is possible to start over, but that is a different practice. think of Spanish shooters with these elongated periods of concentration for each shot.

- floating the pin really works. micro movements will suffer if you want to control consciously. the conscious brain CAN NOT process at same speed than the subconscious. this is the reason for PRACTICING till someone is able subconsciously drive the aiming. Basically this describes instinctive shooting. Shooting is NOT a forced action anymore you can RELY ON motor patterns. Other shooters call it ZEN, FLOW, Mood whatever. Same thing practice and trust in the results.

This is why some targets are easier, some are harder, even at the same size. Whenever you are overthinking the target (processing colors, looking for the center etc. or just having unusual feedback, sound etc), you lose speed of micro-movements and this way control suffers.

I think there are quite straight psychological patterns behind the practice our sport, but there is a complexity of variables that masks many.

Cheers,

Tremo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mark, you used so much fewer words to describe what I had in mind :)
Yeah, it is a revelation, my shooting isnt the same. Even when "aiming", I do it somehow differently now, can't really describe it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,031 Posts
I am a new shooter,and as such, I am in the process of exploring all the various techniques and styles of shooting the slingshot.
My recent exposure to instinctive shooting made me think hard, and I've reached some conclusions.
What follows is my opinion only, based on my own experience, and also based on conversations I've had with Bill Hays and Nathan Masters, two shooters I greatly respect, and consider good examples of two very different approaches to shooting.
Let me start by saying that those two approaches, aiming and instinctive shooting, are in fact the same thing. There is no aiming, and there is no instinctive.
I call aiming differently, I call it conscious aiming, and instinctive I call intuitive aiming. That's for the sake of the conversation.
Every shot we take with the slingshot is an excersise in repetivity, which holds true for both styles, and a conscious effort to aim, or line everything up, contrary to focusing solely on the target, disregarding the frame, and letting the brain take control of our body posture to achieve a hit.
In both case we do aim, but using a different approach to achieve it.
There's no other way to explain why I do ok shooting intuitively, without even caring where the frame is.
And that takes me to the gist of the matter. Why do some people prefer one way over the other? Why do some people find it impossible to shoot one way in favour of the other?
I came to realise that the culprit is simply the power of habit. We get used to one thing, and we distrust that which we think is it's opposite, in essence denying ourselves the understanding that all forms of shooting the slingshot are one and the same.
We shoot for so long, using only one technique, that we become inflexible.
The proof for that is that me, a new shooter, with barely 6-7 months of shooting, with no standard way of doing things, exactly because I am new, find that shooting either way is equally effective. Ttf Vs ott, instinctive Vs aiming, all the same.
I don't know how I hit things intuitively, I don't know how I can adjust my POI, as I don't know why I miss when hard aiming. In fact I know that my release is the culprit, but that's another story, you get the meaning.
Anyway, I may be totally wrong, I haven't read any books, I shoot for only a few months, but this little experience I have, along with my conversations with much better shooters than I am, led me to these conclusions.

Ps. I still can't decide how the heck to shoot, intuitive aiming or hard aiming....God I don't like dillemas, so today I shot a few shots one way, a few the other, with different frames of course. Yeah, dont ask, I am completely undecided because everything works.

Thanks all for reading and putting up with me guys. I know I can become a bit boring, but slingshots is my only past time, I simply enjoy them so much.
Ok......

Skropi, I've actually shot a lot of different ways, experimenting, playing, using all kinds of different techniques and frames... But the most accurate (for me) method is a more strict aiming method.

In fact, I shot this last tournament in a far stricter aiming method than I've ever used in the past at tournaments... I shot TTF, OTF, with a sight plate, and used a cheek bone anchor point, which I kept consistent throughout the tournament shot to shot, no matter the distance or size of target.

When I say, "strict aiming", that's exactly what I mean.... I mean I aimed exactly the same way you would aim if you were using a shotgun loaded with slugs.

I practiced this technique for about a month and was able to do very well with it.

Now, do I prefer the strict aiming method? NO.

I can hit everything very easily and super consistently... but I like the "shoot through a coconut" power that a longer draw brings to the game... the longer, non-static draw point brings into play more variables, and therefore less consistent accuracy.... So what I'm kind of thinking is, I may shoot around the farm with the long fun draw technique.... but when I go to tournaments I may practice for a month or so before and use the light bands, small ammo and static cheekbone anchor technique instead of what I've done in the past.

So I guess what I'm saying is... don't limit yourself. Unless you're planning on entering and trying to win tournaments there's no point in it.

Have fun.... shoot one style for one thing, and another style for something else.

For example, shooting aerial targets... use the snap method of shooting. For static targets at a known distance, use a precision cheekbone anchor style... for general all around shooting, maybe a long draw with loads of power....

There's no need to limit yourself, unless of course you want to be THE most proficient at one particular discipline...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bill, that's exactly what I am doing now, trying all sorts of things. My aim is to become the most proficient I can possibly can, not because I will ever compete, bit because this is what is fun for me.
But in order to achieve that, I believe that I do need to explore every way out there, because every single style had something to offer, and I hope that eventually, I'll be able to combine everything.
As for the strict aiming method....yep, that's what has given me the best results till now too.
This journey is beautiful, trying out stuff, improving, borrowing ideas, talking about it, putting into effect new techniques! I love it, and thank you all for all the help you are continuously offering!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tag

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@MJ I still try to aim strictly, but now, after being exposed to both styles, I find it difficult. I do practice a combination of both ways, as I believe they are actually the same.

@Hulla Baloo When I first read about "aiminstictivsm", I thought that you had no idea about what you were talking. It was me that had no idea about what it is to aim. Sometimes words and their meaning can be misleading, thats why I like the term "intuitive aiming".....I do think that aiminstictivsm is the better term though ????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@MJ I still try to aim strictly, but now, after being exposed to both styles, I find it difficult. I do practice a combination of both ways, as I believe they are actually the same.

@Hulla Baloo When I first read about "aiminstictivsm", I thought that you had no idea about what you were talking. It was me that had no idea about what it is to aim. Sometimes words and their meaning can be misleading, thats why I like the term "intuitive aiming".....I do think that aiminstictivsm is the better term though ????
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top