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Did my first on a couple of blackthorn forks awhile back, sorry no pics, all I did was put a few drops on rub it down with a paper towel quickly and repete. I'm sure if there's a right way I didn't do it but it worked pretty well.
 

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I've found that it's a great way to finish naturals. Boardcuts maybe not so much.
Naturals don't have any flat surfaces, so if the coat is uneven you don't see it. Superglue dries really fast and wil setup unevenly on a flat surface. If you're willing to do lots of coats and lots of sanding it can be worked out but it's not as easy as a traditional poly coat.
 

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MJ made a good point. I love super glue on a natural. . . tried it on a board cut ..it was ugly. Although I think it can be done if you took the time to do it meticulously. However at that point I would just use poly.
 

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heh yeah, I could use that tutorial too.
I tried it on a fork that was on its way to the wastebin, but it did not work too well. I did it in my workshop in the cellar, where it's rather cold, and it turned milky on me.
today I tried it on another fork, few drops of ca, rub on with a paper towel, let it dry, repeat. the first layer became white again, so I rubbed on another coat and took it to a warmer room. looks okay so far, tomorrow I'm gonna sand it and put on a couple more coats, more sanding, and if I get some new ideas or find out how to definitely NOT do it, I'll post.
 

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I use superglue on flat sanded frames quite a bit. It is very possible to get a smooth shiny finish on a flat workpiece The trick is to keep rubbing the superglue into the surface until it just starts to set, You can't do this with a cloth or paper applicator however. I usually just use my finger, and then clean the superglue off with acetone. If I'm doing a lot, I will cut a finger off of a nitrile rubber surgical glove and use that just to keep the buildup from getting too thick. Again, the trick is to keep moving.so you don't glue your finger to your finish. After you get your piece completely covered with a relatively smooth coat, let it set for a while and then buff to a high shine. I use a loose cotton buff on my lathe with Tripoli compound, but you could do it with a rag and some car wax or swirl remover if you are less lazy than I am.

I have done the 20 layers of thin superglue thing on pens in the past, but found that there is not any significant difference after the first few unless you are covering up a problem with the surface under the glue. I usually use one or maybe two coats of medium or thick ca now.
 

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I worked in the basement with it. The fumes got into the heating ducts. Could smell them for 3 days when the heat went on. Wife called oil burner repair man who changed the nozzle in the oil burner. Then I did another fork with the same result. She called the oil burner repair man again -- but I told her to cancel and just wait a while. . . she'll kill me if she finds out what the fumes were, haha!
 

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Well, I know those guys in the videos have a lot of experience ... BUT I would never have a lathe running while I fooled around with a rag. Man, the potential for lightning quick disaster is right there. I might do it with a treadle lathe (foot powered), but probably not even with one of those because of the fly wheel. I once saw a guy have a finger ripped right off of his hand because he was wearing a glove while using a lathe. Machine shops generally ban long sleeved shirts because of the danger around a lathe. I know most of you are not using a lathe while making slingshots. But I just could not resist a word of caution here. Sorry, it has nothing to do with glue ... don't mean to hijack the thread. Just be careful with those power tools is all I am saying.

Cheers ...... Charles
 

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Thanks. I love “how to” videos. I’m with Charles on that one. I worked QC with a printing company once. They used rotogravure presses. OK, not a lathe but close enough. The engravings would periodically become clogged and were cleaned with a hand held pointed stick while the press was in motion. It was known the sometimes these sticks would get drawn into the two rollers. We had a man one morning to get sucked in because he held his stick too tightly. It was messy. Also during the war when many women, half trained, would be running machinery and would get their unsecured long hair entangled. I remember this happening only with drill presses, but I am sure it happened with a lathe also.
 

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... if I get some new ideas ... how to definitely NOT do it, I'll post.
Definitely the type tutorial I tend to need most-est.

[/quote]
okay then, here's one for you: don't glue your fingers together.


...seriously though, thanks for the tutorials, just rubbing the stuff on with a paper towel worked for me, but the surface was not smooth enough, had to sand a lot. also, I will buy some acetone, to be safe.
 
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