Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most of you are aware of the mental toll shooting is taking. Physical stamina is not hard to achieve, as slingshooting doesn't require heavy bands when target shooting, and it doesn't require a high shot count when hunting.
Mental stamina is by far more elusive, it is hard to describe, hard to address, and very hard to fight against.
Up till now, I was fighting with simple things regarding my shooting, but now that I have most of my technique issues solved, what really impeds my shooting, is my mental capacity of staying focused, my inability to get confident after a series of successful hits, and my mind getting tired and heavy.
When I hit consecutively, I feel the irresistible urge to stop shooting, and I do, for a few minutes. I also find that while my body can shoot many shots tirelessly, my mind simply can't.
I really don't know how to train myself in becoming a true machine of shooting. I always shoot better my small targets, exactly because I feel terror when I have to shoot a big, easy target. 40 shots are all I can shoot, then the next 10 need some mental effort, and after that a break is necessary. Of course, when I don't work, I shoot much more than this, but lately I simply can't shoot as much as before, as I concentrate totally in each and every shot.
The only shots that are easy to make, are long distance ones with a long draw. Meaning that whenever I don't have high expectations of my shots, I don't get tired.
When I shoot a 1.7cm target, I rarely miss by much, as I shoot very relaxed, but aim at my 4cm target....and then, just watching the huge size of it, and my body simply becomes heavy. I do hit often, I mean it's not like I am complaining about my accuracy, as I am improving, slowly, but steadily, but I do need to find a mental game that will allow me to shoot in a more relaxed way.
Have any of you felt the same way when you were developing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,105 Posts
Most of you are aware of the mental toll shooting is taking. Physical stamina is not hard to achieve, as slingshooting doesn't require heavy bands when target shooting, and it doesn't require a high shot count when hunting.
Mental stamina is by far more elusive, it is hard to describe, hard to address, and very hard to fight against.
Up till now, I was fighting with simple things regarding my shooting, but now that I have most of my technique issues solved, what really impeds my shooting, is my mental capacity of staying focused, my inability to get confident after a series of successful hits, and my mind getting tired and heavy.
When I hit consecutively, I feel the irresistible urge to stop shooting, and I do, for a few minutes. I also find that while my body can shoot many shots tirelessly, my mind simply can't.
I really don't know how to train myself in becoming a true machine of shooting. I always shoot better my small targets, exactly because I feel terror when I have to shoot a big, easy target. 40 shots are all I can shoot, then the next 10 need some mental effort, and after that a break is necessary. Of course, when I don't work, I shoot much more than this, but lately I simply can't shoot as much as before, as I concentrate totally in each and every shot.
The only shots that are easy to make, are long distance ones with a long draw. Meaning that whenever I don't have high expectations of my shots, I don't get tired.
When I shoot a 1.7cm target, I rarely miss by much, as I shoot very relaxed, but aim at my 4cm target....and then, just watching the huge size of it, and my body simply becomes heavy. I do hit often, I mean it's not like I am complaining about my accuracy, as I am improving, slowly, but steadily, but I do need to find a mental game that will allow me to shoot in a more relaxed way.
Have any of you felt the same way when you were developing?
Have a beer and practice aerials in a secluded place with your preferred instinctive shooter. Bring along something to listen ro music on and play something with fun rhythm. Electro swing can be fun as hell IMO lol. When I first started I used a 4L milk jug with a 18" tether tied to the handle and just busted at it with marbles. Go down to a large juice can, then a sauce can, then a bean can, then a soup can...

Then start torturing yourself in your usual fashion with other various smaller targets. Smallest Ive hit so far was a spent shotgun shell thrown by my dad at almost random. I was working a can and we walked up behind me and said 'Hey Ry' - catch.' Up it went, and I already had a marble in the pouch on my Mr Brooks 'Shogun'. I sent that sucker into the next world lol I must have hit the brass hull flat face on. Imo nothing feels quite as good as shooting something - frankly anything, big or small - out of the air.

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
 

·
See The Target
Joined
·
21,958 Posts
Skropi

I think you already know the answer and even said it yourself .

" The only shots that are easy to make, are long distance ones with a long draw. Meaning that whenever I don't have high expectations of my shots, I don't get tired. "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Treefork, is it really only that? Just a different way of judging my results?
I mean, I could try and pay attention solely on form, making everything revolve around that, and disregard the targets completely, reducing them to a secondary annoyance. Hmmmmmm, maybe that way I can forget about hitting or not hitting, and truly relax?
Ok, I will try and do that in tomorrow's practice. I get to shoot no more than 70 shots when I am working, so, shooting so few shots will help me concentrate on not concentrating on my shooting. It will be hard to accomplish that. I mean, fighting the mechanical aspects of shooting is one thing, something tangible, but the mental one? Elusive and all-encompassing. YES! A new challenge had showed it's face! That's why I love slingshot shooting. It never ceases to amaze me and challenge me!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Eye of the tiger. You need a goal, like cutting a can in half, or a competition with somebody.

If your mind wanders and you start missing but you keep shooting anyway I think you are teaching yourself to miss. Take a break.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BushpotChef

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,097 Posts
That book looks really good!
I've been reading similar books over the last couple years (Book of the Five Rings, The Unfettered Mind, etc) that dealt with a Zen/Taoist approach to martial arts, but one relating to archery seems like it would contain many valuable and applicable lessons.
Check me out quoting myself...
Anyway.
I read the first 20 pages of that book on the pdf that you get clicking the link and it's amazing. I ordered a paperback of it because I like reading books on paper and being able to flip back and forth.
You probably have to already have an interest in the philosophy to get the most out of it, but I think following some of the lessons that the author talks about could really help to deepen the experience of shooting, especially since the mechanics of archery and slingshooting are similar.
For the first several years of my slingshot journey I only focused on hitting targets and progressing and competing and all that. Then I hurt my shoulder and could no longer shoot the way I had up to that point, which was 99% of the time and anchor draw with heavyish looped tubes.
Not wanting to step down ammo size or speed, I adopted a butterfly shooting style. I watched videos of the well known 'fly shooters but nothing really clicked until I started watching Arturo shoot (Arturo Borquez on YT ). He was (is) super smooth, totally relaxed, and effortlessly accurate with FAB and a PFS.
I had surgery, did my time in physical therapy, and kept shooting the buttah. I honed in on mental exercises that helped me shoot better: a focus on smoothness in all aspects, concentrating on the shot I was taking while ignoring all other shots, a willingness to try everything even if it wasn't "my style". I learned to point the ammo at the target and find the line that exists, always, between them. It's always there, just elusive.
Experimentation led me to shooting narrow (2.5" outside width) ttf frames and finding that it provided the clearest connection to the shot. A few times I lapsed into the "flow state" of shooting without thinking, almost observing the shooting as a bystander, with amazing results. Then it went away as I became aware of it and tried to make it stay. So it goes.
I went away from this style for a while and even stopped shooting all together for most of a year as I cultivated a new passion (rock climbing ) and moved to another continent. But ever since I started shooting butterfly and getting more in tune with shooting I've considered slingshot shooting to be my martial art, my form of expression. And now I'm back to a long draw, narrow ttf frames, and a deeper focus and search for enlightenment.
Hippy diatribe over. I don't imagine this was helpful, but you asked. Sort of :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Most of you are aware of the mental toll shooting is taking. Physical stamina is not hard to achieve, as slingshooting doesn't require heavy bands when target shooting, and it doesn't require a high shot count when hunting.
Mental stamina is by far more elusive, it is hard to describe, hard to address, and very hard to fight against.
Up till now, I was fighting with simple things regarding my shooting, but now that I have most of my technique issues solved, what really impeds my shooting, is my mental capacity of staying focused, my inability to get confident after a series of successful hits, and my mind getting tired and heavy.
When I hit consecutively, I feel the irresistible urge to stop shooting, and I do, for a few minutes. I also find that while my body can shoot many shots tirelessly, my mind simply can't.
I really don't know how to train myself in becoming a true machine of shooting. I always shoot better my small targets, exactly because I feel terror when I have to shoot a big, easy target. 40 shots are all I can shoot, then the next 10 need some mental effort, and after that a break is necessary. Of course, when I don't work, I shoot much more than this, but lately I simply can't shoot as much as before, as I concentrate totally in each and every shot.
The only shots that are easy to make, are long distance ones with a long draw. Meaning that whenever I don't have high expectations of my shots, I don't get tired.
When I shoot a 1.7cm target, I rarely miss by much, as I shoot very relaxed, but aim at my 4cm target....and then, just watching the huge size of it, and my body simply becomes heavy. I do hit often, I mean it's not like I am complaining about my accuracy, as I am improving, slowly, but steadily, but I do need to find a mental game that will allow me to shoot in a more relaxed way.
Have any of you felt the same way when you were developing?
Have a beer and practice aerials in a secluded place with your preferred instinctive shooter. Bring along something to listen ro music on and play something with fun rhythm. Electro swing can be fun as **** IMO lol. When I first started I used a 4L milk jug with a 18" tether tied to the handle and just busted at it with marbles. Go down to a large juice can, then a sauce can, then a bean can, then a soup can...

Then start torturing yourself in your usual fashion with other various smaller targets. Smallest Ive hit so far was a spent shotgun shell thrown by my dad at almost random. I was working a can and we walked up behind me and said 'Hey Ry' - catch.' Up it went, and I already had a marble in the pouch on my Mr Brooks 'Shogun'. I sent that sucker into the next world lol I must have hit the brass hull flat face on. Imo nothing feels quite as good as shooting something - frankly anything, big or small - out of the air.

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
Electroswing is an awesome genre and would be fun to goof off with slingshots to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I will read this book for sure. I think that my idea of considering shooting an art itself, and totally disregard the actual result, is somewhat on the right path.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yep, I said "game", and that's the problem, I shouldn't be considering it a game, but an art. When I try to play a difficult part in piano or classical guitar, I never get mentally tired, exact because I just enjoy the process, and consider the totality of said process an art!
That's what I will try and transfer to my shooting :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
There's a philosofical and aesthetical line in the way skropi-san is facing the art of slinghot shooting.

+The implied philosofy is a form of Buddhism named Chan which became Zen in Japan.

CHAN

+The esthetical branch is the Wabi-Sabi, one of the Japanese approach to esthetics:

Mono no aware (the pathos of things), wabi (subdued, austere beauty), sabi (rustic patina), yūgen (mysterious profundity), iki (refined style), and kire (cutting).

JAPANESE AESTHETICS

Food for the mind for years to come or -better said- a life time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,097 Posts
Even setting aside the mystical aspect, there are valuable lessons to be learned from kyudo instruction that are different, even inverse, of western teaching.
Western instruction consists basically of "There's the target, hit it. Once you hit that one, get a smaller one. Move up (down in size) as quickly as possible. Also, prove that you're better than someone else. "
The kyudo instruction starts with stance and focus, then draw technique and breathing, then release and follow through. Mastery of techniques leads to hitting the target, not vice versa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Guys, you were all great help. I just hope it will be easier to change my attitude than it seems. To be honest, it looks impossible to me now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I take it back, it's not impossible. Shot 5 shots, just came back from work, and what I did was simple really. I focused solely on my stance and shot cycle, and on my breathing of course. I didn't focus at all on the targets, as if they arent there, my total focus was my breathing and the....art of shooting itself.
It's too early to know, but two things happened, I did hit my targets, which is ok, I hit them often enough anyway, BUT I was much calmer, and most importantly, I didn't focus at all on the frame or the targets. It's a bit addictive shooting like that. I can't explain it easily, it is like shooting but.....not shooting at the same time.
Anyway, it's a bit confusing, and it's still early, I need to get this mental techniques down not because they bring results on hitting the target, but solely because shooting gets elevated to a higher form, and every movement is a ceremony in and of itself. Ye ye, in a few words, I enjoy this ????
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,097 Posts
I was doing the same thing just now with similar results. I followed the protocol of breathing and drawing and such from the book, including the overhead start, which is pretty neat.
If you want to continue on this journey, I'm with you. I have a setup I'll be using and will try to practice every day at least a little.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Ehm, I haven't read it yet, just got home. What is the overhead start?
MJ, it may sound weird, but I actually didn't focus at all on the targetnand frame. The target was a total blur, as my eyes focused in infinity. The results were more than good, 2/2-3cm spinner, 1/1-1.7cm spinner, 2/2-4cm spinner, 1/1-6cm spinner. Those results mean nothing, I know, I mean, it's not.the first time I hit them, but hit them without actually looking at them? That's a first. I like it, this thing is therapeutic :) I hope I manage to make a habit of this very soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
MJ, It's not a matter of "if" I want to continue in this path, it's the simple matter that, for me, this is the only real path. I can't shoot calmly otherwise.
Oh, and hitting the tiniest target, while you can hardly even see it, as it is blurry and out of focus, is a nice bonus ????
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top