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Just thinking out loud about the sport of "Slingshots"

Speaking for myself and probably many (mostly males that had the opportunity to grow up in a more rural setting) was able to enjoy the sport with our little home-builts made out of mis-formed bits of tree branch and strips of bicycle inner tubes. (ages 6 to 14) then the hormones kicked in and our interests changed :)

Then, for one reason or other, we become drawn back into it, but in a more dedicated way - My own experience , so far, I am realizing that Slingshot shooting & Design/Building, could be quite challenging but in return; a very gratifying past-time.

I am still trying to decide which I like best - "Building" or Shooting" !! . For some, hitting that target is the ultimate goal. Then there are the exceptionals like Bill Hays and many others that have that enviable gift of mastering both. I know I could easily build a "Rifle style Slingshot" and hit the target without all the fuss of keeping a steady arm or developing the perfect release etc .... but, is that what it's all about? ... I think not :)

Cheers & a Joyous Christmas to all !
 

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For me, designing and making slingshots is fun as long as long as there is some form of progress in terms of aesthetics, finish, but above all, in the way each slingshot handles when shooting - particularly with an emphasis on improving accuracy.

After having made somewhere close 50 slingshots (board cuts and steel rod slingshots) and testing a variety of band sets since starting out about 5 years ago, I now know what my personal preferences are when it comes to what I look for in a slingshot design, as I now devote more time to shooting regularly to achieve tight groups at 10 yards with slingshots that are either homemade or purchased.

Like all things, slingshots are a continuous learning experience: this is what I really enjoy about the sport.

Merry Christmas!
 

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Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
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Yeah, it's fun to just dive in and get your hands dirty. Building, shooting, trading, collecting, hunting... The sport has a huge range of possibilities to hold people's interest. The low cost and relative low skill required to buy or make SS also make it easy to dabble in every aspect of the sport. Not so with other shooting sports. Buying guns can be expensive, and building bows can take a lot of skill. I think I saw SS referred to as the "poor man's shooting sport". That suits me (and my budget) just fine!
 
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