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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone else get weird, inventive ideas when they can't sleep? Last night was one of those nights. I put some flats on my Cobra yesterday, the thinnest of the three resistance bands I got to practice making flat bands with because my little one was going to be the one playing with it. She was able to draw it all the way back and zing one of those plastic Barnett balls into the kitchen at a fairly impressive speed considering the almost non-existent draw weight which got me thinking.

Doubling up flats is a fairly common thing but there's got to be a level of friction between the layers, some of you can probably chime in on that since I've got no experience there. But one thought lead to another, and another, then back to slingshots, and on and on. I've shot looped tubes probably 99.89% of the time owning my Torque and that's where thoughts crossed. I'm thinking of trying to make this idea happen just to see how well it works or find out why it doesn't, has anyone ever thought of this before?
 

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I've doubled over flats to keep from having to cut it though I still tied it off at the pouch to keep it from moving. In practice exactly the same as double flats.

Sent from my SM-S920L using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Barely, and only at the pouch end. They would have to go around some type of straight round post but there would be a gap between them the same way looped tubes have a gap between them. Looped tubes just don't need anything special to loop through like flats would. They would need an entirely new designed frame
 

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I have been shooting looped flats on my ringshooter for quite some time simply because it is the easiest way to attach flat bands to a ringshooter. I think you will find them to be like looped tubes. Looped tubes last longer than singles but the draw is heavier. The same is true with flats. A tapered flat is probably going to give more power than looped flats with less draw weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have been shooting looped flats on my ringshooter for quite some time simply because it is the easiest way to attach flat bands to a ringshooter. I think you will find them to be like looped tubes. Looped tubes last longer than singles but the draw is heavier. The same is true with flats. A tapered flat is probably going to give more power than looped flats with less draw weight.
Interesting. Can you compare velocity or band life to flats with the same dimensions that are attached so they touch when pulled back? I know I'm probably chasing an answer to an obscure question here but that's the story of my life
 

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I have been shooting looped flats on my ringshooter for quite some time simply because it is the easiest way to attach flat bands to a ringshooter. I think you will find them to be like looped tubes. Looped tubes last longer than singles but the draw is heavier. The same is true with flats. A tapered flat is probably going to give more power than looped flats with less draw weight.
Interesting. Can you compare velocity or band life to flats with the same dimensions that are attached so they touch when pulled back? I know I'm probably chasing an answer to an obscure question here but that's the story of my life
First of all my looped bands always touch each other for the full length so I don't know how separation would effect band life.

To make looped flats I cut them twice as long and half as wide. For example make single flats 9" X 3/4" so to make loops I cut them 18" X 3/8". I attach the ends to the pouch and the loop goes in the quick attach slot on the ring.

The draw weight seems to be about the same but the speed is some what less. As I said before I do it this way because it is the easiest way to attach flats to a ring shooter. There are many ways but I find this the easiest.
 

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Does anyone else get weird, inventive ideas when they can't sleep? Last night was one of those nights. I put some flats on my Cobra yesterday, the thinnest of the three resistance bands I got to practice making flat bands with because my little one was going to be the one playing with it. She was able to draw it all the way back and zing one of those plastic Barnett balls into the kitchen at a fairly impressive speed considering the almost non-existent draw weight which got me thinking.

Doubling up flats is a fairly common thing but there's got to be a level of friction between the layers, some of you can probably chime in on that since I've got no experience there. But one thought lead to another, and another, then back to slingshots, and on and on. I've shot looped tubes probably 99.89% of the time owning my Torque and that's where thoughts crossed. I'm thinking of trying to make this idea happen just to see how well it works or find out why it doesn't, has anyone ever thought of this before?
Yep, been done a bunch of times.... but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be proud of coming up with it on your own though!

You might want to look up some of ZDP-189's old posts on the subject... he even had a band cutting jig/template for them.
 

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From an empirical perspective, and having used double-layered Theraband blue bands tapered to 40% (very fast), it would make sense for several layers of thinner flat band rubber to yield higher projectile velocities, as opposed to a single layer of the same rubber with the same total thickness of the layered flat bands.

I assume that less molecular resistance of each thinner layer of a layered set of flat bands compared to the molecular resistance of a single thicker layer is involved here during the rapid elastic contraction phase after the pouch is released. Technically, this behavior should also reflected in lower draw weights with layered bands compared to thicker single bands (or several thinner tubes vs a single thicker tube, for that matter).

A far fetched analogy of this interesting behavior of layered thinner flat bands compared to single thicker layered band set, is that of a single cylinder 600 cc motorcycle engine compared to a 4-cylinder 600 cc motorcycle engine, where the latter will definitely have a smoother power output with a far higher RPM: the power curve is way more progressive on the 4-cylinder engine. ( :what: ?)

Thus, 2 thin layers of flat bands will have a smother and faster "power curve", as opposed to a single layered set of flat bands with a thickness identical to that of the 2 thin layers...hope this makes sense. At least that is how I understand the overall concept.

Thus, there is a valid reason to have several layers of flat bands, or several thinner tubes. Whether they are looped or not probably makes no difference.

Any opinions on this?
 
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