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Hello everybody,

Slingshot target practice at 10 yards has become one of my daily routines, with an emphasis on consistency in terms of tight groups, based on the 4 cm wide metal plate targets seen at the Gualdo Tadino (Italy) tournament of 2018.

I alternate between circles or crosses marked on cardboard placed against old bath towels (no loss of steel ammo this way), and have found that better aiming and tighter groupings occur with drawn crosses ("plus" signs) as compared to drawn circles. It seems to me that one needs a very specific focal point to achieve top accuracy, something that the intersection of two lines clearly provides, as opposed to circles.

Indeed, steel ammo impacts around a drawn circle seem to occur more frequently than impacts inside the circle, even when all the aspects of correct shooting technique are taken into consideration. It seems easier hitting the center, or much closer to the center of drawn intersecting lines, as compared to drawn circles.

I have yet to try shooting at marked circles with various colors to differentiate them from the overall target background: contrast facilitates aiming and hitting targets. I remember using a recurve bow years ago, and finding it easier to hit a red plastic coke bottle cap (1 to 1.5 inches wide) at 30 yards than achieving tight arrow groupings on the yellow center circle of an archery target.

Clearly, my eyesight is no longer that of a 20-year old (I once had 20/20 vision), but that is not the issue here.

What has been your personal experience with regard to such target shooting issues?
 

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Absolutely, the finer the point of aim the better the accuracy.
Indoor archery has a circle and an X, in 3D archery just has a big area to shoot. That's when you have to pick a previous hole to aim at. Brand new 3D targets are really hard to pick a spot on
 

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The eye and the mind need a point of focus. In your illustration, I note that the shots to the line of the circle are as close as the ones to the lines of the X. Sighting in targets provide that point even when that point is a circle, as the contrast of colors and patterns emphasize to that point. A plain circle has no point inside of it and the eye and mind shoot at what it can see, The line.

:twocents:
 

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I think the old saying goes like this: "Aim Small, Miss Small".

I always liked one of Bill Hays videos in which he says (I'm paraphrasing) . . . 'when you shoot at a can, don't just try to hit the can, but pick out the lettering on the can and aim for that'.

So yes, the intersecting lines should encourage greater focus and therefore greater accuracy.
 

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I’ve been waiting for just the right time to ask this question, so here goes. There are several ways to mark the center of a circle, what method do you use
 

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I just eyeball it. Close enough is close enough.
 
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