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I never shot from Scout but the fork hit - I believe has nothing to do with the design and with make of that slingshot.

What I can think of is, firstly, it is possible that the bands on left and right side are not equal in strength, and there can be a number of reasons for that no matter how much attention the maker put into cutting them precisely.

Secondly, it can be the release or not holding the slingshot right, that is, the center of the ammo and tips of the right and left fork do not make a true letter "V".

cheers,

jazz
 

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Yep what the guys already said. Most of the time its an issue with releasing the pouch improperly. Pinch on top of the ammo and not in front of it. If you get your finger in front of the ammo the pouch has to bounce over your finger and it can throw the shot. Also its easy to accidentally roll the pouch out of center. Try drawing back like normal and then take a look at whether or not the pouch is still even.
 

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All good comments above. I'll just add in an effort to alleviate your concern over the Scout being the source of your problem, its not. The Scout is my go-to slingshot. Have made thousands of shots using TTF and never a fork hit. Pay attention to what others have said and you should find your problem. Also be careful not to 'cant' your frame when shooting.
 

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All good advice, I'd also suggest try shooting OTT and again, pinch the ammo itself (not in front of it) and twist the pouch 90 degrees to the frame. I hold my frames sideways and hold my ammo straight up and down.

Unfortunately, it's something we've all dealt with when starting out, don't get frustrated!
 

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What everyone else said! For me the two big issues were not aligning the frame, bands and pouch properly. And having a sloppy release. I cured the first by just slowing down and really watching the alignment as a drew back. My release got much better by switching to larger ammo. I shoot marbles now. The larger size allowed me to get a better grip on the ammo and not pinch in front of it. Just make sure everything is in a straight line and don't be afraid to try different things. I rotate my pouch hand slightly towards my face because it is more comfortable. Just don't tweak the pouch!

A tip on the release from traditional archery... You can't physically open your hand fast enough without affecting the release. Instead of doing something (letting go quickly), you actually want to STOP doing something. You simply stop holding the pouch and let it slip from your fingers. Just relax your hand/finger muscles and it will slip away on its own.

Also, try to not hold your pouch hand in a fist. Hold with your thumb and index finger, but allow your middle, ring and pinky to stay straight and relaxed. The closed fist causes too much tension and a lot more effort is needed to release. Of course your mileage may vary, but this all helped me!
 

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Fork hits are an inevitable part of the learning curve. Mine always seem to occur when I am shooting a wood slingshot as opposed to my more durable plastic ones. Plastic wood and sandpaper is your friend!

I do not have a Scout, but from what I understand, it is a sturdy slingshot and designed for beginners to experiment with. Lots of good advice here on release. I was also told to hold the slingshot arm s steady as possible and pay attention to your follow through.

I was shooting one of my favorite custom wood slingshots (a gift from a forum member) this weekend. I rushed a shot and let my form collapse. I put quite a divot in the fork, which I repaired with wood putty. I maintained good form for the rest of the session and no more fork hits.

I think that ultimately, the only way to avoid all fork hits is to leave the slingshot on the shelf. I do not think that is what the builder of the custom wood slingshot intended. Slingshots are meant to be shot. They are inexpensive enough to replace and most of us quickly accumulate a collection. Keep shooting!
 

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As the others have mentioned, a correct release technique is essential - namely not pinching the steel ammo beyond the top of the sphere inside the pouch.

Frame canting can be an issue too, but of lesser importance than the release technique. Here is how I do it:
 

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Solid advise given here. I would add to make sure your bands are the same length, sounds simple but from experience it happens. if they are not the same length one will be pulled tighter than the other and your shot power will be unbalanced throwing your shot. Just my 0.02 :)
 

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Don't get discouraged. I learned what I know (not enough)from my trusty scout. My scout looks like the craters on the moon. I've shot my thumb, the forks, and am the only person in the southwest who has shot his index finger twice in a row!
Ya just gotta shoot every shot with as much precision as you can, until you can do it without thinking.
 
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