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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Like many of us, I haven't been into TTF slingshots for very long. It's actually been just a little over a year since I laid down the wrist rockets and discovered real slingshots.

Also, like many of us, I suffered with fork hits (and hand hits, oh yes). I just couldn't understand what I was doing wrong.

Well, those of us who are stupid and masochistic enough to stick with it soon learn how to get the ball through the gap, eventually and painfully. You learn the Trick, usually through YouTube. After a bit, the fork hits become less frequent until they disappear almost completely.

It's then you learn that the size of the fork gap doesn't really make much difference. Once you learn the trick, you stop with fork hits, big or small gap, whatever.

Now, the question is, which do you prefer? It doesn't matter for fork hits. It only matters for accuracy and preference.

We're all different. That's the thing you quickly learn about slingshots: What works for one won't work for the other.

I much prefer small fork gaps. I'm just more accurate with them. 50 mm is about right.

What do you guys think. Does fork gap affect accuracy, beyond personal preference??
 

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I would say that it 'can' if it is not your preferred natural width though the challenge can be overcome by a competent shooter to make a frame work for him or her. Being consistent with something that is not the preferred might be the real test. While we are able to adapt and get used to any frame, I think we do all have "default settings" that we unconsciously revert to (then have to consciously adjust from)? I have yet to find the one for me that is perfectly natural and just right... or is that a pipe dream?
 

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Mojave Mo
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I went deep into the rabbit hole on fork width one time. Then I discovered that I was focusing on my target so intently that I forgot that I was holding a slingshot.

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I prefer an outside fork measurement of 3" to 3 1/2". That leaves me with a 1 1/2" to 2" gap. I guess this is somewhat narrow. This width works great for my aiming style. If I go too wide then I lose my ear anchor point when shooting longer distances.
 

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Mojave Mo
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Great post, and the replies are equally interesting. Mo made a very point when shooting any slingshot.
I think it is fair to point on that a year ago it took FIVE fork hits and one seriously painful hand hit before I taught myself to stop looking at the fork. #DontLook

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Ray Rowden
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My guess is that fork gap doesn't have much affect on accuracy or trajectory.

But for me, fork width makes a difference in my aiming point. Fork widths of about 3 inches places the point of ammo impact just above the top fork with my usual TTF setups. Fork widths of about 4 inches places the point of impact behind the top fork for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pulling a slingshot forms an isosceles triangle. As far as a trigonometry equation would go, changing the angles of the triangle would be one one of the most significant things you could do. In other words, two slingshots, that were identical in every way but had a different fork width, would be way more different in physics, than two totally different frame designs that had the same fork width.

Therefore, theoretically, fork width is what makes the difference, not fork gap.

Except that isn't true
 

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Like many of us, I haven't been into TTF slingshots for very long. It's actually been just a little over a year since I laid down the wrist rockets and discovered real slingshots.

Also, like many of us, I suffered with fork hits (and hand hits, oh yes). I just couldn't understand what I was doing wrong.

Well, those of us who are stupid and masochistic enough to stick with it soon learn how to get the ball through the gap, eventually and painfully. You learn the Trick, usually through YouTube. After a bit, the fork hits become less frequent until they disappear almost completely.

It's then you learn that the size of the fork gap doesn't really make much difference. Once you learn the trick, you stop with fork hits, big or small gap, whatever.

Now, the question is, which do you prefer? It doesn't matter for fork hits. It only matters for accuracy and preference.

We're all different. That's the thing you quickly learn about slingshots: What works for one won't work for the other.

I much prefer small fork gaps. I'm just more accurate with them. 50 mm is about right.

What do you guys think. Does fork gap affect accuracy, beyond personal preference??
What is "The Trick?" I've seen some info about avoiding fork hits but I haven't seen one particular solution. I'd be interested, though. Here's my story with fork hits:

I shoot only TTF and have from the first time I shot a slingshot other than a wrist rocket as a kid. I've been shooting now for almost a year. At first I was getting lots of fork hits and had no idea what was happening. As I got better, they gradually reduced, yet would appear out of nowhere. As I got better and better at doing all the little things right, they became more and more infrequent, yet would still pop up occasionally. Several months ago, I changed my pouch hold. Now I twist the pouch 90 degrees. This has done several things for me. My accuracy became very much more consistent due to a more consistent release. Also, my anchor point is more consistent. AND, no more fork hits. They have completely disappeared.

Now, I just purchased a new wood slingshot from Tony the Slinger. It's a beauty, but it has narrower forks than any other slingshot I have. I haven't shot it yet, and I don't want to mar it with fork hits. What is "The Trick?" I suspect whatever it is I must already be doing it, but I'd like to know anyway.

I'll let you know if my accuracy improves with the narrower fork gap.
 

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My guess is that fork gap doesn't have much affect on accuracy or trajectory.

But for me, fork width makes a difference in my aiming point. Fork widths of about 3 inches places the point of ammo impact just above the top fork with my usual TTF setups. Fork widths of about 4 inches places the point of impact behind the top fork for me.
Your post at first puzzled me, but now it has produced an "Ah ha!" moment.

The differences in fork gap for my slingshots haven't made any difference to me where the target sits in relation to my top fork. What HAS made a difference that I've noticed is band length. As I've experimented with different band lengths, I've noticed that shorter lengths - which of course also makes them faster - cause me to lower my aim point, whereas longer bands cause me to raise it. If they're too long, I can't see the target because I have to raise my aim point until the target is obscured by the top fork.

Reading your post and looking at your style of shooting, I've think I've figured out why. Technically, if the slingshot was producing a laser beam without a trajectory, every target would be obscured by the top fork. The truth is, to compensate for gravity, I think we all make a subconscious upward adjustment based on experience.

Your anchor point puts the band you're aiming down closer to your eye. I anchor at the corner of my mouth. (I was an instinctive archer for years, so I used this point when I started to ease my transition.) Because my anchor point is my mouth and I'm aiming using my eye, I create a more severe upward angle. That means that with faster bands, I'll shoot high unless I aim below my target. Which I do.

This has several other implications, which I'm realizing even as I write this.

Anyway, thanks! Your post has revealed a piece of the puzzle for me.
 
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