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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This fork made me smile every time I looked at it..but I couldn’t see the catty within..I wanted to get some input from everyone on how they go about shaping, sanding and finishing there nattys..as with all my dried forks there are cracks to deal with..I’ve had two sessions on it so far and have pics of each step..it’s had it’s first rough sanding..I like to use the natural shape of the fork if I can so this only has influenced the shape..comments questions criticism all welcome..cheers
 

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I like it. I have a couple really lumpy looking forks like this that I have no idea what to do with.

I'm not sure what scares me more. Messing up with a really beautiful piece of wood and ruining it, or starting out with something crazy like this end making the end result into something boring and plain.

The hardest part for me on a freeform natural is knowing when to stop shaping it. I had one a while ago that I wanted to get a perfect handle shape and ended up ruining it, making it very weak. Now I'm more relaxed about the initial shaping. I've been using one for several weeks now that is not finished. The use has really helped me see what needs doing and what can stay as it is.

Its early days for me though. I expect to have at least a few more end up on the junk pile before I know what sort of shapes I can get out of a natural fork.
 

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Brook that shook out very well. I know that one was a challenge. I would have passed that fork right up but look what you did with it. What is it? Apple? Beech? I really like the pic's as you went on.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I like it. I have a couple really lumpy looking forks like this that I have no idea what to do with.
I'm not sure what scares me more. Messing up with a really beautiful piece of wood and ruining it, or starting out with something crazy like this end making the end result into something boring and plain.
The hardest part for me on a freeform natural is knowing when to stop shaping it. I had one a while ago that I wanted to get a perfect handle shape and ended up ruining it, making it very weak. Now I'm more relaxed about the initial shaping. I've been using one for several weeks now that is not finished. The use has really helped me see what needs doing and what can stay as it is.
Its early days for me though. I expect to have at least a few more end up on the junk pile before I know what sort of shapes I can get out of a natural fork.
Cheers mate..I do look for big gnarly forks to dig into but with the tips at the angle they are I'm not sure how it's going to shoot..i know what you mean between doing work on a fork or frame I'll keep it on hand just to get a feel for it and mark areas with a pencil that need some work..I'm always messing up too but try to salvage or reuse for scales and butts..this has got some heft so if things don't work out it'll make a good cosh lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Brook that shook out very well. I know that one was a challenge. I would have passed that fork right up but look what you did with it. What is it? Apple? Beech? I really like the pic's as you went on.
Cheers Dave ???? this ones Holly..the challenge isn't over yet lol I'm hoping for some advice on best way to go about finishing it up.. I'm still not set on the shape my next step would be to keep sanding with the grain doubling the grit each stage I've never tried wet sanding and don't know what to do with the cracks????
 

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I love that forward fork design, it makes a frame sit perfectly in hand. You've got quite a fine frame there and a good comfortable shooter too. My recommendation,... Sand, finish, shoot!
 
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