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Hello everybody,

So, almost everyone dislikes sanding :cursin: according to the replies in my previous question on the issue of making slingshots.

Let's continue this interesting topic:

What is the one piece of advice that you would give to newcomers to our highly creative sport when they set out to make their first slingshot, and like all of us, want to get it right? :hmm:

I'll start: draw your design, cut out a cardboard shape to get a basic feel of what the result might be, and plan your different stages ahead of the actual making process to anticipate potential problems. Also, think safety glasses and working gloves...

What advice would you give?
 

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First off all learn to love sanding. Hahaha...

Join a the friendliest teaching forum ever.

Watch hours Youtube.

Start a collection of cardboard designs from pdfs.
Get a slow curing epoxy.

Learn about ways to finish woods.

Keep pictures of all the stages of each piece, especially the failures, and add notes along the way.

Start simple to build skills.
 

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Great Thread!

Make a difference between a piece for show and a piece for testing. Use time where it counts. I like to build a proof of concept boardcut first, test it and if I am satisfied only then will build and actually sand something. You don't need too much tools to start, but use the BEST sanding papers you can get. It really makes a change.

Take notes on the build and log the time you spent with building...

Cheers,

T
 

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Like Matt I would say take it slow I’ve ruined a couple of frames from over cutting or rasping to much away and it’s sucks loosing hours of work..going back to your other thread that’s what I hate most..doing something wrong and loosing time
 

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I would recommend this:

1. Start with a board cut

2. Use a birch plywood board 18-20mm thick

3. Choose a proven design

4. Check the comfort of the grip in between again and again

5. Take your time before you start sanding and beautify the surface
 

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I remember seeing a picture on one of the forums back when I started making slingshots. I can't find it now, but it was regarding how to round over the fork tips, and looked something like this.

fork tip.jpg
 

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Another few:

Band Grooves are more often than not; Unnecessary.

Don't be afraid to blow up a fork.

Sometimes you and a build will not get along. It is okay to put it on a shelf for an attempt on a later day.

For a while you will think just about everything could be made into a shooter, later you will know that just about everything can be made into a shooter.
 

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If you are impatient by nature - you may want to settle for "Ready Made"

Get to know your tools and their potential also, there is no substitute for "sharp tools"

I haven't tried it yet - but I plan on getting a piece of high density foam for experimenting with shapes.
 

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Cut a few natural forks. Get some thick leather strips from the craft store and a leather punch. Learn the wrap and tuck technique. Experiment with different elastics and ways of rigging the elastics. Experiment with different ammo. Like Henry said, don't worry about pretty in the beginning, just functional and shootable. I've been doing this for a few years now and I still don't worry too much about pretty. Accuracy is what I chase and pretty has nothing to do with it.

Then maybe buy a model from a vendor. Spend some time with it. Figure out what you like about it and what you don't like. Armed with that info, make a board cut or two from 3/4" plywood. Any decent plywood will do. You can get the fancy stuff after you are sure you like your design. Or you can be like me and just use the cheaper stuff all the time.

This is probably the least expensive shooting hobby that there is. But if you want to dump a lot of cash, the sky is the limit.
 

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I've come back and forth to this post thinking about what I would tell a newbie builder and I think I finally know what I wanna say.

Just do it, man!

(With eye protection.)
 
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