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"Southern Flip Style"
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In response to many questions about how do I shoot, I have tried to think about it and write it down as concisely as possible. Please add your methods and insights to the thread as it can really benefit those who have never shot before and even others who would just like to try a different style.

I guess I would call the way I shoot "Instinctive Flip Style." Over the years I think I've tried them all. I can shoot all the different ways if I force myself to use them for a day or two, however, for me instinctive flip style just seems to go together with the relaxed, casual nature of shooting slingshots.

I mostly enjoy shooting cans (love the sound they make, and the way they jump) and hunting small game when I'm able, so this is the most fun and rewarding way for me. Hunting more often than not requires quick shots at unknown distances so being able just to pull up and shoot is a real benefit. Most would be amazed at how quickly you can develop this skill if you just practice, and in this case practice is fun!!!!

I would be the first to say that I'm not some "crackshot" in anyway. I have days when I can't seem to hit the proverbial "side of the barn," other days I surprise myself!!! I also suffer from "don't watch me" itits, ie; I shoot great until someone begins to watch me. Just self-conscious I guess, but not uncommon because of the relaxed concentration required to shoot this way.


Instinctive shooting requires shooting lots and lots of ammo, and shoot it often enough that it stays apart of your mental/physical connection. It requires mentally picking a spot on the target, say the size of a shirt button, and intensely focusing on that while at the same time seeing the forks in relation to the target in your peripheral vision while drawing the bands. I usually release instantly as I achieve full draw with a little forward flip of the forks toward the target. Your brain calculates the rest after a while, most of the time.


The great longbow archer Howard Hill called this "split vision aiming" because he didn't completely shoot "instinctive". He said with him it was really a mix. I think that's true with all "reflexive" (instinctive) activities like golf, tennis, baseball hitting and pitching. It takes lots of practice and a few learned skills. The main thing is to enjoy the process of learning and shooting!!!


Aim small, miss small!
Perry
 

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Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
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Thanks, Perry. Some of us need all the advise we can get.
 

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I'm a expert in the point and pray method.
 

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I shoot the same way as Perry does.

And i am shooting the same way with a recurve bow, with good results


Every body can do it, but it needs lot and lot of practice.
 

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yes I shoot that way also the push pull and flip,I look at the target but I dont use the fork to aim momentarilly, I use the tubes as mine are fixed two on each side of the fork I take the top tubes and sight directly between them to give me the line and shoot about four inches above the fork from a distance of 33 feet.I to usually shoot at very small targets it needs alot more concentration than hitting a can.
 

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Tex-shooter
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All of my forks are designed so when shooting with one fork tip directly above the other, the corner of the top tip is the sight at about 30 feet when I lock under my cheek bone. When I wing shoot or instinctive shoot I hold the fork the same way, but I draw further back behind my ear and concentrate on the target. See my small avatar picture. -- Tex
 

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Perry, your exlanation is right on. I have forced myself to try all the methods thinking I was missing something because I was missing too much. When I reverted back to my child hood years of shooting without aiming I was then able to somewhat retrain my brain in this style that some find is more hits. The brain will automatically adjust what you see and after a while you can hit most anything. But some of us must aim. I have tried fork aiming and I lost a fingernail because of it so in the midst of weeping and cursing I decided to do it in a way that my body will allow for. Now I can hit most anything at 30 feet with no aim. I like to practice with targets the size of bottle caps at 30 feet or less. My draw is 58 inches with my arm fully extended but I have found something out about not extending the arm all the way, If I pull my slingshot arm in up to half way my accuracy for some reason improves on smaller objects sort of fine tunes things for me. Perhaps someone out there could give a reason why this would happen. I would add, whatever works for you.
 

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smaller targets, I aim for by drawing from the corner of my mouth, and putting the top edge of the rubber on the target.
I can hit targets 4,5cm in diameter from 10 meters away for most of the time now, i'd say about 75% hitrate when i'm focussed.

bigger targets (10 cm and up) I can hit instinctively, or by muscle memory, dunno, really, I just draw and release when it feels right
 

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I too am a split vision shooter, both with bows and slingshots, though my release isn't as instantaneous as old Howard's was (that dude was simply superhuman with the bow and arrow).
 

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Instinctive shooting requires shooting lots and lots of ammo, and shoot it often enough that it stays apart of your mental/physical connection.
In my opinion and personal experience...it's not rocket science. The above sentence hits the nail on the head. Hall of Fame Pitchers and Quarterbacks don't read on how to reach their respected levels. Carson Palmer, quarterback of the Cincinnati Bengals, says he was always throwing something. He said he would spend hours at the creek skipping rocks on the water. The more rounds you shoot, the more your body will adapt to the motion. You will get better, EVEN IF YOU DON'T WANT TO. My .02.
 

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I can hit targets 4,5cm in diameter from 10 meters away for most of the time now, i'd say about 75% hitrate when i'm focussed.
I can't hit anything 75% of the time. I hit a coke can at 15 yards about 7% of the time and I'm happy
-- as long as most of my misses come within inches, that is!

. . . But I'm improving all the time; think of all the fun I have ahead of me, trying to learn how to shoot straight
 

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I can hit targets 4,5cm in diameter from 10 meters away for most of the time now, i'd say about 75% hitrate when i'm focussed.
I can't hit anything 75% of the time. I hit a coke can at 15 yards about 7% of the time and I'm happy
-- as long as most of my misses come within inches, that is!

. . . But I'm improving all the time; think of all the fun I have ahead of me, trying to learn how to shoot straight

[/quote]

The important thing is you are having fun!!!
I use both methods now to shoot The chinese style with aiming at the forktip I realy like, its like you are using a pistol pluss I am pretty accurate with it now.Then Now Ihave started to use the hammer grip with instictive shooting it is fun too as you dont need that much concentration to do it .It amazes me that how much power it has as my drow is 80-85 cm with it and with the chinese stlye is only72 .I I actualy just started today this style so I am happy if I hit near to the target but After few hundred shots I got pretty close and even hit my target at 10 meters.

Cheers
 

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All of my forks are designed so when shooting with one fork tip directly above the other, the corner of the top tip is the sight at about 30 feet when I lock under my cheek bone. When I wing shoot or instinctive shoot I hold the fork the same way, but I draw further back behind my ear and concentrate on the target. See my small avatar picture. -- Tex
TEX I HAVE MY HAWK FROM YOU THANKS IT SHOOTS VERY FAST.IS THIS HOW YOU SHOOT THE HAWK?I TRYED TO SHOOT IT LIKE YOU ON THIS QUOTE.BUT IT SHOOTS LOW.DO YOU HAVE ANY TIPS ON SHOOTING THE HAWK?ITS ALOT DIFFERENT FROM MY BENT STEEL SLING SHOOTS.
 

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Tex-shooter
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You can walk the band line for shot elevation. Also for closer ranges, you can place sight marks on the cams with Typing white out like shown below. I use the marks to judge different distances. When sight shooting I lock out under my cheek bone near the base of my ear (see my avatar to the left). -- Tex
 

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You can walk the band line for shot elevation. Also for closer ranges, you can place sight marks on the cams with Typing white out like shown below. I use the marks to judge different distances. When sight shooting I lock out under my cheek bone near the base of my ear (see my avatar to the left). -- Tex
sight marks on the cams.works grate thanks for the tip.
 

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You can walk the band line for shot elevation. Also for closer ranges, you can place sight marks on the cams with Typing white out like shown below. I use the marks to judge different distances. When sight shooting I lock out under my cheek bone near the base of my ear (see my avatar to the left). -- Tex
where do you get the 1/2"steel balls?
 

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"Southern Flip Style"
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2,647 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You can walk the band line for shot elevation. Also for closer ranges, you can place sight marks on the cams with Typing white out like shown below. I use the marks to judge different distances. When sight shooting I lock out under my cheek bone near the base of my ear (see my avatar to the left). -- Tex
where do you get the 1/2"steel balls?
[/quote]

I carry them for sale. Look on my website.
Perry
 

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Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
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In response to many questions about how do I shoot, I have tried to think about it and write it down as concisely as possible. Please add your methods and insights to the thread as it can really benefit those who have never shot before and even others who would just like to try a different style.

I guess I would call the way I shoot "Instinctive Flip Style." Over the years I think I've tried them all. I can shoot all the different ways if I force myself to use them for a day or two, however, for me instinctive flip style just seems to go together with the relaxed, casual nature of shooting slingshots.

I mostly enjoy shooting cans (love the sound they make, and the way they jump) and hunting small game when I'm able, so this is the most fun and rewarding way for me. Hunting more often than not requires quick shots at unknown distances so being able just to pull up and shoot is a real benefit. Most would be amazed at how quickly you can develop this skill if you just practice, and in this case practice is fun!!!!

I would be the first to say that I'm not some "crackshot" in anyway. I have days when I can't seem to hit the proverbial "side of the barn," other days I surprise myself!!! I also suffer from "don't watch me" itits, ie; I shoot great until someone begins to watch me. Just self-conscious I guess, but not uncommon because of the relaxed concentration required to shoot this way.


Instinctive shooting requires shooting lots and lots of ammo, and shoot it often enough that it stays apart of your mental/physical connection. It requires mentally picking a spot on the target, say the size of a shirt button, and intensely focusing on that while at the same time seeing the forks in relation to the target in your peripheral vision while drawing the bands. I usually release instantly as I achieve full draw with a little forward flip of the forks toward the target. Your brain calculates the rest after a while, most of the time.


The great longbow archer Howard Hill called this "split vision aiming" because he didn't completely shoot "instinctive". He said with him it was really a mix. I think that's true with all "reflexive" (instinctive) activities like golf, tennis, baseball hitting and pitching. It takes lots of practice and a few learned skills. The main thing is to enjoy the process of learning and shooting!!!


Aim small, miss small!
Perry
Excellent advice there Perry, I've found that only allowing the slingshot to 'flip' as much as it does naturally produces more consistent results, also consistency is the key to consistent results! That may sound a bit obvious but I have found it to be of vital importance: always ensure that you fashion and attach your pouches in an identical manner, use the same stance and hold and release the pouch in the same way, you will then be surprised by just how accurate you can be!
 

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"Southern Flip Style"
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks Sam!!! What you said was a nice addition!
 
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