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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read through the "Tubes vs Bands" thread, and did not see the answer I am looking for.
(Yes. I may be blind and missed it. If that is the case, my apologies.)

Which is "better" insofar as longevity, and velocity are concerned? Tubes or Bands?

Do more than one tube per arm/fork really have any advantages over a single tube?

I'm going to order a new slingshot for taking out a few of the too many black not a crow birds (I hope) around here.

If the assisted living facility I am at won't pluck, gut, and cook them, I'm pretty sure their fluffy kitty will enjoy eating them, plucked and gutted or not.

Thank you in advance.
 

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Tubes r quite flats not so much . Tubes last longer and r simple to make and u can do a few different things with them . Flats u need cutting mat and a rotor cutter straight edge and have to mark them out .If u get a bad cut band set will not last long. But easy to pull flats and do different tappers get some wicked power and adjust for different ammo . There’s no cut and dry answer just have to try them both and come to your conclusion really. Just my two cents buy good tube not stuff from eBay 10 dollars get u 10 meters of premium tube Hope this helps
 

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Ray Rowden
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Tubes are the longevity champs, they shoot quietly, and they are easy to build bandsets with.

If you start with the very lightweight 1632 tubes, you can set up singles to shoot .177 BBs, 1/4-inch, 5/16-inch at very respectable speeds, and 3/8-inch at a lob, all from a 30-inch draw. Set up as full loops (or doubles) the same tubes are good with 3/8-inch steel, 5/8-inch glass or 1/2-inch steel. But to drop a crow, or even a Grackle, I'd move up to 2040 full loops and 3/8-inch or 1/2-inch steel. Full loops are twice as hard to draw with the same tubes, and that can be a problem. Pseudo-tapers (configured with a looped section at the fork and single section at the pouch) can give most of the performance of full loops with less draw weight, but don't last as many shots.

I have no personal fondness for the Chinese slingshots built to use three tubes per side.

Tapered flats offer the most speed for a given draw weight, and if you cut your own, they are about infinitely customizable. But it is equipment intensive. Many shooters take up that challenge,and some of us enjoy it!

Whichever you choose, plan on spending a few weeks practicing and honing your skills before going after the birds. Even pests should be dispatched humanely, and that requires good shot placement.

Good luck!
 

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Neophyte
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Over all tubes are easier to setup and if done properly shoot really accurately. A good bent steel rod slingshot frame is simple to put the tube sets onto and very durable. A workable rod frame can be bought on ebay quite cheaply and is no less accurate that anything else. Usually the tubes that come with these shooters are just about useless without modification, 1632 or 1636 looped tubes are simple to set up and work great with 3/8 inch steel. 2040 will really send the 3/8 steel with authority too.

All of that said flats are my first choice as I like to tinker with setups and have the equipment to produce them. They require a small amount more equipment but nothing crazy ( you can buy it all at walmart ) There are a few tricks I can share to save money if you want.

If you have any questions fire away and I will do my best to answer them. :)

Disclaimer **not an expert just trying to help**
 

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I like to shoot both ! I find the advantages of tubes are they last a lot longer subsequently costing less. I only shoot tubes in full loops and I find it much easier, quicker and less frustrating making bandsets than flat bands. I find that flat bands typically shoot faster relative to the draw weight they have, but tubes will still shoot plenty fast enough if you match your ammo correctly. I have a "target" style draw which means I draw to my face at about 32" and I find 1842 dankung tubes to be my favourite for 9 or 10mm steel. 2040 are also good for 8 or 9mm steel and have a slightly lighter draw.

Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk
 
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