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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lately I have been shooting what I call my Little Tiger PFS a lot. It has become my favorite SlingShot because I shoot it very good as far as accuracy.

Only problem is I get some really nasty hand slap, some days seems worse than others. I am shooting 3/4 butterfly with about a 38" draw, so maybe some days I am drawing farther and making the hand slap worse.

I am using .070 USOPP green latex and shooting 3/8" steel, My active band length is 9.5" so with my 38" draw that is only a 1/4 ratio, but the bands do feel like they are pretty much maxed out.

I did try some 7/16" steel and it didn't really seem to make much difference.

I like the speed and power I am getting, but not the hand slap. Any suggestion as to how to lessen the hand slap?
 

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See The Target
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Try wrapping the band ties close to the end of the fork tips .This will raise the rebound path of the bands after release . Hold the frame with a forward lean to it and follow thru with a flipping motion of the slingshot hand upon release . ( The classic flip style release ) . What your trying to accomplish is a higher return path of the bands so they miss hitting the hand entirely .
 

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Generally speaking, hand slap results from flat bands with a draw weight that by far exceeds what is needed for the ammo weight involved: it is the excessive energy that makes it back to your hand. Good calibration of draw weight with ammo weight usually cancels out hand slaps with slingshots.

0.7 mm thick flat band rubber is quite stout by definition.

I would therefore suggest:

- Cutting flat bands that are narrower and tapered (say 30%) to bring the draw weight in line with the 9.5 mm and 11 mm ammo you appear to be using;

- If this is not possible, consider making a "shield" using heat-shaped PVC to be mounted on the the front side of the slingshot to protect the fingers;

- Wearing a protective leather glove until you can further explore one of the other two options above.

The fact that the bands are very much in line with the holding hand in view of the PFS design most likely makes the hand slap problem worse than it would be with a more regular fork width (just an assumption).
 

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Ray Rowden
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Looks like your current bands are about 3/4" straight cuts.

Give 1/2" a try. And, as previously mentioned, get your ties right to the top of the forks.

Lucky it's pretty warm now. You really want to get this issue resolved before winter. LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looks like your current bands are about 3/4" straight cuts.

Give 1/2" a try. And, as previously mentioned, get your ties right to the top of the forks.

Lucky it's pretty warm now. You really want to get this issue resolved before winter. LOL!
They do have a bit of taper 3/4" to 5/8"

Actually here in upstate NY the weather is still almost like winter. Most days lately highs only in the 40's.
 

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Ray Rowden
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2,462 Posts
Looks like your current bands are about 3/4" straight cuts.

Give 1/2" a try. And, as previously mentioned, get your ties right to the top of the forks.

Lucky it's pretty warm now. You really want to get this issue resolved before winter. LOL!
They do have a bit of taper 3/4" to 5/8"

Actually here in upstate NY the weather is still almost like winter. Most days lately highs only in the 40's.
I shoot butterfly a lot with 3/8 steel. My taper is usually 1/2" to 1/4" cut to 14" for a 56" draw. I started using that cut with TBG, but it works well for me with the .55 latex I'm using now. It's a can shredder.

I guess my point here is that when you cut the bands longer, they have more potential power, and it's easy to stack up more power than you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Looks like your current bands are about 3/4" straight cuts.
Give 1/2" a try. And, as previously mentioned, get your ties right to the top of the forks.
Lucky it's pretty warm now. You really want to get this issue resolved before winter. LOL!
They do have a bit of taper 3/4" to 5/8"
Actually here in upstate NY the weather is still almost like winter. Most days lately highs only in the 40's.
I shoot butterfly a lot with 3/8 steel. My taper is usually 1/2" to 1/4" cut to 14" for a 56" draw. I started using that cut with TBG, but it works well for me with the .55 latex I'm using now. It's a can shredder.
I guess my point here is that when you cut the bands longer, they have more potential power, and it's easy to stack up more power than you need.
I haven't tried full butterfly yet, not sure how it will go, both my shoulders are not too good, had surgery on the left one and it didn't help much. I do have 10m of 1745 tube ordered so I will probably give it a try after it gets here.
 

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Ray Rowden
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2,462 Posts
Looks like your current bands are about 3/4" straight cuts.
Give 1/2" a try. And, as previously mentioned, get your ties right to the top of the forks.
Lucky it's pretty warm now. You really want to get this issue resolved before winter. LOL!
They do have a bit of taper 3/4" to 5/8"
Actually here in upstate NY the weather is still almost like winter. Most days lately highs only in the 40's.
I shoot butterfly a lot with 3/8 steel. My taper is usually 1/2" to 1/4" cut to 14" for a 56" draw. I started using that cut with TBG, but it works well for me with the .55 latex I'm using now. It's a can shredder.
I guess my point here is that when you cut the bands longer, they have more potential power, and it's easy to stack up more power than you need.
I haven't tried full butterfly yet, not sure how it will go, both my shoulders are not too good, had surgery on the left one and it didn't help much. I do have 10m of 1745 tube ordered so I will probably give it a try after it gets here.
Save your shoulders, bud!

Start your butterfly adventure with something that draws much lighter than 1745 tubes!

Besides, you want a clean release if the ammo is passing within an inch of your cheek. That's a bigger challenge pulling all that weight.
 
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