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Today chatting to my wife I told her about some branches that have been on the ground where I shoot and how beautiful they look. So I cut a few pieces off and brought home. She tells me they are Wild Cherry.

So my question is, is Wild Cherry good for making some PFS's and the larger peice a 3 Amigos? The miniature logs are 2" (50mm) diameter and my template fits the larger peice just right.

Sorry for waffling on, I try not to ????
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cherry is generally very suitable for frames! Beautiful to boot. Color me jealous.

Just be careful of grain orientation, and I wouldn't go below half an inch for thickness!
Excellent thank you. And you answered my next question on thickness, so thank you again. Tongue oil final process for these
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Not used a core before, excellent suggestion thank you and I have plenty for several builds. Can't believe I've been stepping over it for months.
 

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Wild Cherry is not only excellent for making frames (with some hints as above) but in my country it is also a protected plant so that it is kinda exotic for me.

Use it wisely,

cheers,

jazz
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wild Cherry is not only excellent for making frames (with some hints as above) but in my country it is also a protected plant so that it is kinda exotic for me.

Use it wisely,

cheers,

jazz
I searched for the tree it came from, but no sign of it. Sadly I think it may have been cut to the ground and the larger pieces taken away.

I'll definately be putting a lot of thought into it's use, before it makes a trip to the work bench. Thank you
 

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Grandpa Pete
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Cherry wood is wonderful. You didn't say if the wood is dead or green. In any event you need to dry it out slowly. If it completely dry I would suggest that you seal the ends of the logs with wax or give them a good coat of varnish and let the dry for a while ( up to a year) before you start cutting into them, That way you will avoid cracking and checking.

GP
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Cherry wood is wonderful. You didn't say if the wood is dead or green. In any event you need to dry it out slowly. If it completely dry I would suggest that you seal the ends of the logs with wax or give them a good coat of varnish and let the dry for a while ( up to a year) before you start cutting into them, That way you will avoid cracking and checking.
GP
They were fortunately under tree cover and easy to cut to bring home, so quite dry already. Good advice thank you, I'll leave them for a while yet, just to make really sure. Waxing the ends it will be
 

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Grandpa Pete
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Cherry wood is wonderful. You didn't say if the wood is dead or green. In any event you need to dry it out slowly. If it completely dry I would suggest that you seal the ends of the logs with wax or give them a good coat of varnish and let the dry for a while ( up to a year) before you start cutting into them, That way you will avoid cracking and checking.
GP
They were fortunately under tree cover and easy to cut to bring home, so quite dry already. Good advice thank you, I'll leave them for a while yet, just to make really sure. Waxing the ends it will be
Good idea. Even wood that appears dry can have quite a bit of moisture in it if it has been on the ground for a while. Good luck with it. Cutting into a nice piece of hardwood is ""kind of like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get. "( credit Forrest Gump).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cherry wood is wonderful. You didn't say if the wood is dead or green. In any event you need to dry it out slowly. If it completely dry I would suggest that you seal the ends of the logs with wax or give them a good coat of varnish and let the dry for a while ( up to a year) before you start cutting into them, That way you will avoid cracking and checking.
GP
They were fortunately under tree cover and easy to cut to bring home, so quite dry already. Good advice thank you, I'll leave them for a while yet, just to make really sure. Waxing the ends it will be
Good idea. Even wood that appears dry can have quite a bit of moisture in it if it has been on the ground for a while. Good luck with it. Cutting into a nice piece of hardwood is ""kind of like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get. "( credit Forrest Gump).
Know what you mean lol I'll do some others first and keep lusting over this wood until I know the wood and myself are ready.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Cheers guys

Wild cherry basic with maple and epoxy resin coat. Plenty of handcrafting. Without power tools making a such catapult is f.n hard work. But the spent time stands for it
That is lush, well worth the time and effort. Excellent craftsmanship also ????
 

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I made a couple cherry ones all I know is be careful with the dryness had a couple crack and seemed dry TIL the frames came into house cool to warm and cracked baddddd ! But nice looking wood
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I made a couple cherry ones all I know is be careful with the dryness had a couple crack and seemed dry TIL the frames came into house cool to warm and cracked baddddd ! But nice looking wood
Sounding more like these will definitely be waiting for a while just to make sure. I have some cutting board and a bamboo cutting board to experiment with in the meantime.
 
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